Got that mojo workin'

The Democrat political edge so talked about a few months ago seems to have dulled. 

 The words "sleeping giant" are being invoked to describe the town hall phenomenon sweeping America. This is correct, up to a point.  Many of those who rallied behind Obama were fashionistas in pursuit of the latest trend, in this case, support of a charismatic person. 

Fashion is a very shaky foundation for a political movement, because what's in one year is by the definition of fashion out the next.  Many more were in love with the idea of voting for an articulate black man who promised to transcend both race and partisanship, an ideal that was eroding even before the inauguration.  In either case, a cult of personality was more in evidence than a concrete set of political beliefs.  

Those protesting today in town halls have a belief system and a bigger stake in the outcome than making a feel good fashion statement.

Another difference is that the Obama campaign itself organized venues to get new people involved.  As a recent article in my local paper noted, the Tea Party movement has brought together a disparate group not tied to any previously existing political apparatus.  The Mamas for Obama may have met their match in the Mamas against big government

As I contrast and compare the anti Health Care bill protestors who arrive in their own vehicles with homemade signs to the pro Health Care protestors who arrive in busses, wearing union colors and brandishing machine made signs, I am reminded of what a then member of powerful Chicago politician Mike Madigan's extended political family said to me 25 years ago. This operative told me that Republicans never won because all they did was write checks to pay others to do the real work.   Democrats, on the other hand, always turned out a small army of enthusiastic workers willing to go door to door, man phone banks and show up to cheer enthusiastically at huge rallies.
The Democrat political edge so talked about a few months ago seems to have dulled. 

 The words "sleeping giant" are being invoked to describe the town hall phenomenon sweeping America. This is correct, up to a point.  Many of those who rallied behind Obama were fashionistas in pursuit of the latest trend, in this case, support of a charismatic person. 

Fashion is a very shaky foundation for a political movement, because what's in one year is by the definition of fashion out the next.  Many more were in love with the idea of voting for an articulate black man who promised to transcend both race and partisanship, an ideal that was eroding even before the inauguration.  In either case, a cult of personality was more in evidence than a concrete set of political beliefs.  

Those protesting today in town halls have a belief system and a bigger stake in the outcome than making a feel good fashion statement.

Another difference is that the Obama campaign itself organized venues to get new people involved.  As a recent article in my local paper noted, the Tea Party movement has brought together a disparate group not tied to any previously existing political apparatus.  The Mamas for Obama may have met their match in the Mamas against big government

As I contrast and compare the anti Health Care bill protestors who arrive in their own vehicles with homemade signs to the pro Health Care protestors who arrive in busses, wearing union colors and brandishing machine made signs, I am reminded of what a then member of powerful Chicago politician Mike Madigan's extended political family said to me 25 years ago. This operative told me that Republicans never won because all they did was write checks to pay others to do the real work.   Democrats, on the other hand, always turned out a small army of enthusiastic workers willing to go door to door, man phone banks and show up to cheer enthusiastically at huge rallies.