Going for the media's throat

Thomas Lifson
Mark Lloyd, a scary radical who has a plan to impose stifling government control, has been appointed as "chief diversity officer" at the FCC. A disciple of Alinksy, he laid out his strategies in a 2006 book.

Matt Cover of CNS News has done us a great service by actually reading the book "Prologue to a Farce: Communications and Democracy in America" (University of Illinois Press).

In the book, Lloyd also said that public broadcasting should be funded through new license fees charged to the nation's private radio and television broadcasters, and that new regulatory fees should be used to fund eight new regional FCC offices.
 
These offices would be responsible for monitoring political advertising and commentary, children's educational programs, number of commercials, and content ratings of the programs. ...

Frequently referencing one of his heroes, left-wing activist Saul Alinsky, Lloyd claims in his book that the history of American communications policy has been one of continued corporate control of every form of communication from the telegraph to the Internet.

There's much more. A chief diversity officer can harass, and probably force a lot of information out of companies. Lloyd clearly wants government to be the dominant voice in information.

Nothing could be at further variance to the American tradition than state control of media.
Mark Lloyd, a scary radical who has a plan to impose stifling government control, has been appointed as "chief diversity officer" at the FCC. A disciple of Alinksy, he laid out his strategies in a 2006 book.

Matt Cover of CNS News has done us a great service by actually reading the book "Prologue to a Farce: Communications and Democracy in America" (University of Illinois Press).

In the book, Lloyd also said that public broadcasting should be funded through new license fees charged to the nation's private radio and television broadcasters, and that new regulatory fees should be used to fund eight new regional FCC offices.
 
These offices would be responsible for monitoring political advertising and commentary, children's educational programs, number of commercials, and content ratings of the programs. ...

Frequently referencing one of his heroes, left-wing activist Saul Alinsky, Lloyd claims in his book that the history of American communications policy has been one of continued corporate control of every form of communication from the telegraph to the Internet.

There's much more. A chief diversity officer can harass, and probably force a lot of information out of companies. Lloyd clearly wants government to be the dominant voice in information.

Nothing could be at further variance to the American tradition than state control of media.