Did al-Megrahi really have only 3 months to live?

Rick Moran
Storm's a-brewin', laddie. Best get undercover. And by all means, stick to your story because "The best-laid schemes o' mice an 'men Gang aft agley."

Indeed, Scottish Justice Secretary Kenny MacAskill may have schemed to get the Lockerbie terrorist Ali Mohmed al-Megrahi out of prison on a "compassionate release" voucher that, according to Scottish Law, was invalid.

It seems that Kenny relied on the advice of one doctor only who claimed the terrorist had "less than 3 months to live." That is the standard under law by which a prisoner can be granted early release.

David Maddox of Reuters has the details:

Doubts about Megrahi's life expectancy have already been raised by American relatives of the 270 victims of the bomb that blew up Pan Am flight 103 over Lockerbie on 21 December, 1988. But last night the Scottish Government said it would not publish details of the individual who gave the crucial advice.

Mr MacAskill has said he based his decision to release Megrahi on the opinions of a range of experts.

But this is contradicted by a decisive report sent to Mr MacAskill on 10 August.

While it noted that four prostate cancer specialists - two oncologists and two urologists - were consulted, the summary said: "Whether or not prognosis is more or less than three months, no specialist would be willing to say."

The report suggests that only one doctor was willing to support the claim that Megrahi had just weeks to live.

The medical report stated that the "less than three months to live" prognosis was: "In the opinion of Megrahi's (the name or title of the individual was then blanked out] ... who has dealt with him prior to, during and following the diagnosis."

There was also a suggestion that Megrahi might not be as ill as had been claimed. The report said: "Clinicians who have assessed Mr Megrahi have commented on his relative lack of symptoms when considering the severity and stage of underlying disease."

There is also some evidence that the doctor who made the recommendation for early release by confirming that al-Megrahi had only 3 months to live may have been a Libyan national.

Prior to this news, it was just a happy coincidence that the terrorist's release would open the doors to trade and business opportunities between Scotland and Libya. Now it appears that the whole event was concocted and MacAskill may have violated Scottish law to secure the release of the terrorist.

This story absolutely refuses to die and may end up bringing down the Scottish government.

Storm's a-brewin', laddie. Best get undercover. And by all means, stick to your story because "The best-laid schemes o' mice an 'men Gang aft agley."

Indeed, Scottish Justice Secretary Kenny MacAskill may have schemed to get the Lockerbie terrorist Ali Mohmed al-Megrahi out of prison on a "compassionate release" voucher that, according to Scottish Law, was invalid.

It seems that Kenny relied on the advice of one doctor only who claimed the terrorist had "less than 3 months to live." That is the standard under law by which a prisoner can be granted early release.

David Maddox of Reuters has the details:

Doubts about Megrahi's life expectancy have already been raised by American relatives of the 270 victims of the bomb that blew up Pan Am flight 103 over Lockerbie on 21 December, 1988. But last night the Scottish Government said it would not publish details of the individual who gave the crucial advice.

Mr MacAskill has said he based his decision to release Megrahi on the opinions of a range of experts.

But this is contradicted by a decisive report sent to Mr MacAskill on 10 August.

While it noted that four prostate cancer specialists - two oncologists and two urologists - were consulted, the summary said: "Whether or not prognosis is more or less than three months, no specialist would be willing to say."

The report suggests that only one doctor was willing to support the claim that Megrahi had just weeks to live.

The medical report stated that the "less than three months to live" prognosis was: "In the opinion of Megrahi's (the name or title of the individual was then blanked out] ... who has dealt with him prior to, during and following the diagnosis."

There was also a suggestion that Megrahi might not be as ill as had been claimed. The report said: "Clinicians who have assessed Mr Megrahi have commented on his relative lack of symptoms when considering the severity and stage of underlying disease."

There is also some evidence that the doctor who made the recommendation for early release by confirming that al-Megrahi had only 3 months to live may have been a Libyan national.

Prior to this news, it was just a happy coincidence that the terrorist's release would open the doors to trade and business opportunities between Scotland and Libya. Now it appears that the whole event was concocted and MacAskill may have violated Scottish law to secure the release of the terrorist.

This story absolutely refuses to die and may end up bringing down the Scottish government.