Cap and trade dead in the Senate?

This seems pretty conclusive, although the writing has been on the wall almost since the House passed cap and trade. It was Obama's last great legislative triumph and Democratic House members went way out on a limb supporting their leader - even at the expense of jobs in their own states.

It looks like the Senate is going to yank the ground out from underneath them, according to this piece in Bloomberg by Daniel Whitten and Simon Lomax:

The U.S. Senate should abandon efforts to pass legislation curbing greenhouse-gas emissions this year and concentrate on a narrower bill to require use of renewable energy, four Democratic lawmakers say. "The problem of doing both of them together is that it becomes too big of a lift," Senator Blanche Lincoln of Arkansas said in an interview last week. "I see the cap-and-trade being a real problem."

The resistance by Lincoln and her Senate colleagues undercuts President Barack Obama's effort to win passage of legislation that would cap carbon dioxide emissions and establish a market for trading pollution allowances, said Peter Molinaro, the head of government affairs for Midland, Michigan- based Dow Chemical Co., which supports the measure.

"Doing these energy provisions by themselves might make it more difficult to move the cap-and-trade legislation," said Molinaro, who is based in Washington. "In this town if you split two measures, usually the second thing never gets done."

The House passed cap-and-trade legislation in June.

Leaders of the Democratic-controlled Senate say they are sticking with their plan to combine a version of that bill with a separate measure mandating energy efficiency and the use of renewable sources such as solar and wind power. The legislation also provides for an extension of offshore oil and gas drilling in certain areas, broadening its support.

Hard to see how the Democrats can get a veto-proof 60 votes on cap and trade now - unless, as Lincoln suggests, they narrow the scope of the bill and deep six the emissions provisions. There are just too many vulnerable Democrats who would have to explain to the home folks why they voted for a bill that is expected to cost 2 million jobs.

This may actually help in the health reform debate as the House is much more likely to approve a public option than the senate. Will House Democrats once again put their hides on the line by voting for socialized medicine only to see the senate remove that provision in conference?

It only puts more pressure on the House Blue Dogs to say no to Obamacare.



This seems pretty conclusive, although the writing has been on the wall almost since the House passed cap and trade. It was Obama's last great legislative triumph and Democratic House members went way out on a limb supporting their leader - even at the expense of jobs in their own states.

It looks like the Senate is going to yank the ground out from underneath them, according to this piece in Bloomberg by Daniel Whitten and Simon Lomax:

The U.S. Senate should abandon efforts to pass legislation curbing greenhouse-gas emissions this year and concentrate on a narrower bill to require use of renewable energy, four Democratic lawmakers say. "The problem of doing both of them together is that it becomes too big of a lift," Senator Blanche Lincoln of Arkansas said in an interview last week. "I see the cap-and-trade being a real problem."

The resistance by Lincoln and her Senate colleagues undercuts President Barack Obama's effort to win passage of legislation that would cap carbon dioxide emissions and establish a market for trading pollution allowances, said Peter Molinaro, the head of government affairs for Midland, Michigan- based Dow Chemical Co., which supports the measure.

"Doing these energy provisions by themselves might make it more difficult to move the cap-and-trade legislation," said Molinaro, who is based in Washington. "In this town if you split two measures, usually the second thing never gets done."

The House passed cap-and-trade legislation in June.

Leaders of the Democratic-controlled Senate say they are sticking with their plan to combine a version of that bill with a separate measure mandating energy efficiency and the use of renewable sources such as solar and wind power. The legislation also provides for an extension of offshore oil and gas drilling in certain areas, broadening its support.

Hard to see how the Democrats can get a veto-proof 60 votes on cap and trade now - unless, as Lincoln suggests, they narrow the scope of the bill and deep six the emissions provisions. There are just too many vulnerable Democrats who would have to explain to the home folks why they voted for a bill that is expected to cost 2 million jobs.

This may actually help in the health reform debate as the House is much more likely to approve a public option than the senate. Will House Democrats once again put their hides on the line by voting for socialized medicine only to see the senate remove that provision in conference?

It only puts more pressure on the House Blue Dogs to say no to Obamacare.