AARP urges seniors to jump off the healthcare cliff

A letter from AARP I received gets right to the point. The first two sentences read:
I will get right to the point. As our leaders seek solutions to the current economic crisis, we need your help to remind them that we can't fix our economy without fixing health care.
(The bolding and underlining is theirs.)

The next part of the letter is a dire description of the straits we are in, framing everything in terms of a "crisis." They strongly urge the AARP member to do the following:

  • 1. Sign an enclosed petition to my elected officials (whom they've named, specifically, I suppose for those clueless enough not to know who their elected officials are). The petition urges the elected officials to support health care reform.
  • 2. Then, they hit you up for a contribution (so they can keep their worthless organization churning out misguided guidance to America's older population).

The letter ends with bulleted points outlining all the great benefits of health care reform. It reads like a candy store looks to a child.

Enclosed with the panic stricken letter is a Q&A pamphlet loaded with disinformation.

AARP must be taken to task. Their base is comprised of older Americans, some if not many of whom, are vulnerable to the influence of a Good Housekeeping seal-of-approval organization that essentially tells them what to do.

I'm trying to decide whether to send back the sase:

...with nothing in it.

...with some monopoly money.

...with a long diatribe about the bill.

...with a short and sweet note, no longer than three sentences long that borders on, or crosses over the border, to snide, curt, and rude.

Any thoughts?

Update: Big Fur Hat was inspired by this blog (hat tip: TwoIron).

acorn-aarp
A letter from AARP I received gets right to the point. The first two sentences read:
I will get right to the point. As our leaders seek solutions to the current economic crisis, we need your help to remind them that we can't fix our economy without fixing health care.
(The bolding and underlining is theirs.)

The next part of the letter is a dire description of the straits we are in, framing everything in terms of a "crisis." They strongly urge the AARP member to do the following:

  • 1. Sign an enclosed petition to my elected officials (whom they've named, specifically, I suppose for those clueless enough not to know who their elected officials are). The petition urges the elected officials to support health care reform.
  • 2. Then, they hit you up for a contribution (so they can keep their worthless organization churning out misguided guidance to America's older population).

The letter ends with bulleted points outlining all the great benefits of health care reform. It reads like a candy store looks to a child.

Enclosed with the panic stricken letter is a Q&A pamphlet loaded with disinformation.

AARP must be taken to task. Their base is comprised of older Americans, some if not many of whom, are vulnerable to the influence of a Good Housekeeping seal-of-approval organization that essentially tells them what to do.

I'm trying to decide whether to send back the sase:

...with nothing in it.

...with some monopoly money.

...with a long diatribe about the bill.

...with a short and sweet note, no longer than three sentences long that borders on, or crosses over the border, to snide, curt, and rude.

Any thoughts?

Update: Big Fur Hat was inspired by this blog (hat tip: TwoIron).

acorn-aarp