What is DOJ hiding in the New Black Panther case?

Rick Moran
Republican Congressmen want to know the answer although Democrats seem perfectly content to have a bunch of thugs physically blocking access to  polling places, using racial slurs and carrying nightsticks. Perhaps since their president is trying to turn America's economy into a third world mess they believe aping banana republic electoral tactics just follows naturally.

To try and find out why the Obama Justice Department dropped the case (or at least to get them on record saying it was for political purposes), a group of prominent GOP lawmakers have dispatched a letter to the DOJ Inspector General asking him to look into the matter.

This Washington Times editorial aptly titled "Flak Panthers" has the details:

Frustration with Justice Department stonewalling boiled over Thursday when Republican members of Congress wrote to the department's inspector general, asking him to "investigate whether improper political considerations led the Justice Department to dismiss" the case. The letter was signed by a list of prominent lawmakers with direct oversight responsibilities, including all the minority party members of the House Appropriations subcommittee on commerce, justice and science and all but one of the Republican members of the House Judiciary subcommittee on the constitution, civil rights and civil liberties.

This isn't the first attempt to get some answers from the Justice Department. Texas Republican Rep. Lamar Smith, the ranking member on the House Judiciary Committee, wrote the department's Civil Rights Division on May 28. Virginia Republican Rep. Frank Wolf wrote Attorney General Eric H. Holder Jr. on June 8. Even the Civil Rights Commission, which rarely issues letters without any dissent, has sent two letters to the department asking for an explanation. The numerous requests have received no response.

As Thursday's letter from Congress states: "The dismissal of the Department's case against the New Black Panther Party raises significant concerns about possible politicization of the Justice Department. The case in question was filed by the Department against members of the New Black Panther Party and two individuals affiliated with it. Significantly, one of those individuals carried credentials indicating he was a member of the local Democratic Committee."

There really isn't much of a mystery why the case was dropped after the defendants offered no defense and the Department had a slam dunk win in its grasp; one of the local New Black Panther party defendants was carrying credentials at the time of his arrest indicating he was a member of the local Democratic party committee.

Hat Tip: Ed Lasky





Republican Congressmen want to know the answer although Democrats seem perfectly content to have a bunch of thugs physically blocking access to  polling places, using racial slurs and carrying nightsticks. Perhaps since their president is trying to turn America's economy into a third world mess they believe aping banana republic electoral tactics just follows naturally.

To try and find out why the Obama Justice Department dropped the case (or at least to get them on record saying it was for political purposes), a group of prominent GOP lawmakers have dispatched a letter to the DOJ Inspector General asking him to look into the matter.

This Washington Times editorial aptly titled "Flak Panthers" has the details:

Frustration with Justice Department stonewalling boiled over Thursday when Republican members of Congress wrote to the department's inspector general, asking him to "investigate whether improper political considerations led the Justice Department to dismiss" the case. The letter was signed by a list of prominent lawmakers with direct oversight responsibilities, including all the minority party members of the House Appropriations subcommittee on commerce, justice and science and all but one of the Republican members of the House Judiciary subcommittee on the constitution, civil rights and civil liberties.

This isn't the first attempt to get some answers from the Justice Department. Texas Republican Rep. Lamar Smith, the ranking member on the House Judiciary Committee, wrote the department's Civil Rights Division on May 28. Virginia Republican Rep. Frank Wolf wrote Attorney General Eric H. Holder Jr. on June 8. Even the Civil Rights Commission, which rarely issues letters without any dissent, has sent two letters to the department asking for an explanation. The numerous requests have received no response.

As Thursday's letter from Congress states: "The dismissal of the Department's case against the New Black Panther Party raises significant concerns about possible politicization of the Justice Department. The case in question was filed by the Department against members of the New Black Panther Party and two individuals affiliated with it. Significantly, one of those individuals carried credentials indicating he was a member of the local Democratic Committee."

There really isn't much of a mystery why the case was dropped after the defendants offered no defense and the Department had a slam dunk win in its grasp; one of the local New Black Panther party defendants was carrying credentials at the time of his arrest indicating he was a member of the local Democratic party committee.

Hat Tip: Ed Lasky