Two Peas ... One Alien Pod

Eileen McDevitt and Larrey Anderson
We can’t make this stuff up. Professor Henry Louis Gates, Jr. has announced that the incident at his home  (where he was arrested for disorderly conduct last week) is “not about me at all.”

What is it with this new logic that is no logic at all? President Obama has said (many, many times) that -- whatever the particular issue at hand might happen to be – “It’s not about me.”

He said the presidential election was not about him.  He said his inauguration was not about him.

Just a couple of days ago Obama said:

"This isn't about me. This isn't about politics. This is about a health care system that is breaking America's families, breaking America's businesses, and breaking America's economy…"

In all of these instances I detect a very thin veneer of false modesty covering up huge egos.

These men, both of them, are so great that they transcend their physical acts and epistemological presence.  It’s never about them because they are just too important to be tied down to something as mundane as reality.

As far as I know there is no name for this kind of logical fallacy. (The fallacy of dicto simpliciter is about as close as I can get.)  So I have made up a new name for those who claim something that is clearly all about them is not about them:

Cum ego ergo propter ego.


We can’t make this stuff up. Professor Henry Louis Gates, Jr. has announced that the incident at his home  (where he was arrested for disorderly conduct last week) is “not about me at all.”

What is it with this new logic that is no logic at all? President Obama has said (many, many times) that -- whatever the particular issue at hand might happen to be – “It’s not about me.”

He said the presidential election was not about him.  He said his inauguration was not about him.

Just a couple of days ago Obama said:

"This isn't about me. This isn't about politics. This is about a health care system that is breaking America's families, breaking America's businesses, and breaking America's economy…"

In all of these instances I detect a very thin veneer of false modesty covering up huge egos.

These men, both of them, are so great that they transcend their physical acts and epistemological presence.  It’s never about them because they are just too important to be tied down to something as mundane as reality.

As far as I know there is no name for this kind of logical fallacy. (The fallacy of dicto simpliciter is about as close as I can get.)  So I have made up a new name for those who claim something that is clearly all about them is not about them:

Cum ego ergo propter ego.