The anti-Christian bias in the White House

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A brilliant scientist who discovered the gene that afflicts cystic fibrosis victims was recently named by the president to the post of Director of the National Institute of Health, the nation's primary research lab.

Dr. Frances Collins's accomplishment in finding the CF gene is compared to "the discovery of one disabled bulb in the entire American electric web.

Brilliant, able, and he would seem to be a perfect fit, right?

Marty Peretz at The New Republic:

So what's wrong with Collins?

He is a practicing and believing Christian. It's odd--isn't it?--that this fact should make a scientific designee unfit or unsuited for a job. Soon we will hear the same about judicial nominees. The establishment mounted a sustained campaign in the Senate (and outside) against President Wilson's nomination of Louis D. Brandies to the Supreme Court on the grounds that the candidate was Jewish, although some of his critics tended to be euphemistic rather than direct about their objections. Not so those who are against Collins.

The president must have anticipated this reaction. It is reassuring that he did not crumble in advance.

For a bunch of idealogues who profess tolerance as their hightest aim, animus by liberals toward believing Christians is getting out of control. What do they hate? Take your pick but my own belief is that it is faith itself - in anything - they despise. Modern liberalism is, at its base, a cynical belief system that ascribes the worst motives to their opponents while psychologically rejecting any faith-based belief system because it requires a leap beyond their narrow definition of "reality" (which is really a self-created worldview that relies on emotion, not fact). Are they also jealous of the certainty people of faith have about their God and the rules He set down for them to live by? I think that's part of it too.

Regardless, believing Christians will probably have a tough time in this administration considering the left's lack of tolerance for people whose lives are infused with faith in something larger than themselves.



A brilliant scientist who discovered the gene that afflicts cystic fibrosis victims was recently named by the president to the post of Director of the National Institute of Health, the nation's primary research lab.

Dr. Frances Collins's accomplishment in finding the CF gene is compared to "the discovery of one disabled bulb in the entire American electric web.

Brilliant, able, and he would seem to be a perfect fit, right?

Marty Peretz at The New Republic:

So what's wrong with Collins?

He is a practicing and believing Christian. It's odd--isn't it?--that this fact should make a scientific designee unfit or unsuited for a job. Soon we will hear the same about judicial nominees. The establishment mounted a sustained campaign in the Senate (and outside) against President Wilson's nomination of Louis D. Brandies to the Supreme Court on the grounds that the candidate was Jewish, although some of his critics tended to be euphemistic rather than direct about their objections. Not so those who are against Collins.

The president must have anticipated this reaction. It is reassuring that he did not crumble in advance.

For a bunch of idealogues who profess tolerance as their hightest aim, animus by liberals toward believing Christians is getting out of control. What do they hate? Take your pick but my own belief is that it is faith itself - in anything - they despise. Modern liberalism is, at its base, a cynical belief system that ascribes the worst motives to their opponents while psychologically rejecting any faith-based belief system because it requires a leap beyond their narrow definition of "reality" (which is really a self-created worldview that relies on emotion, not fact). Are they also jealous of the certainty people of faith have about their God and the rules He set down for them to live by? I think that's part of it too.

Regardless, believing Christians will probably have a tough time in this administration considering the left's lack of tolerance for people whose lives are infused with faith in something larger than themselves.