'Reformed' Gitmo inmate killing Americans in Afghanistan

His name is Abdullah Ghulam Rasoul (nickname: Zakir) and he surrendered to the American forces in Afghanistan in late 2001.

Taken to Guantanamo, he spent 6 years in our custody until he was turned over to the Afghan government in 2007 when they promised to make sure he didn't pick up arms against the US again.

Promises are cheap:

Now as the United States is pushing ahead with the massive Operation Khanjar in the southern province of Afghanistan, Zakir is coordinating the Taliban fighters. Some 4,000 U.S. Marines and hundreds of Afghan forces have faced some resistance as they sweep across the province, reclaiming control of districts where Zakir and his comrades were running a shadow government.

Zakir was released from Afghan custody around 2008, according to the New York Post. He re-established connections with high-level Taliban leaders in Afghanistan and Pakistan after his second release. 

Taliban chief Mullah Omar appointed Zakir in mid-2008 as senior military commander, according to the newspaper.

Zakir quickly became a charismatic leader, helping establish an "accountability commission" to track spending and monitor activities of Taliban leaders in the districts where they held power and were running a shadow government, according to the Post.

Explaining why Zakir was released from Gitmo, the defense official said, "We were under incredible pressure from the world to release detainees at Gitmo. You just don't know what people are going to do.

"He was no worse than anyone else being held at Gunatanamo Bay," the official added. "He was not going to be tried for war crimes so we decided to release him. Either he was not thought to have committed a crime or we didn't have enough evidence to prosecute him."

The Fox News story quoted above has the US official blaming Afghanistan. But in reality, it is our fault. The Bush administration buckled under pressure from our allies and began to release inmates from Gitmo that we knew would probably take up arms again.

A helluva price to pay for bowing to political correctness.



His name is Abdullah Ghulam Rasoul (nickname: Zakir) and he surrendered to the American forces in Afghanistan in late 2001.

Taken to Guantanamo, he spent 6 years in our custody until he was turned over to the Afghan government in 2007 when they promised to make sure he didn't pick up arms against the US again.

Promises are cheap:

Now as the United States is pushing ahead with the massive Operation Khanjar in the southern province of Afghanistan, Zakir is coordinating the Taliban fighters. Some 4,000 U.S. Marines and hundreds of Afghan forces have faced some resistance as they sweep across the province, reclaiming control of districts where Zakir and his comrades were running a shadow government.

Zakir was released from Afghan custody around 2008, according to the New York Post. He re-established connections with high-level Taliban leaders in Afghanistan and Pakistan after his second release. 

Taliban chief Mullah Omar appointed Zakir in mid-2008 as senior military commander, according to the newspaper.

Zakir quickly became a charismatic leader, helping establish an "accountability commission" to track spending and monitor activities of Taliban leaders in the districts where they held power and were running a shadow government, according to the Post.

Explaining why Zakir was released from Gitmo, the defense official said, "We were under incredible pressure from the world to release detainees at Gitmo. You just don't know what people are going to do.

"He was no worse than anyone else being held at Gunatanamo Bay," the official added. "He was not going to be tried for war crimes so we decided to release him. Either he was not thought to have committed a crime or we didn't have enough evidence to prosecute him."

The Fox News story quoted above has the US official blaming Afghanistan. But in reality, it is our fault. The Bush administration buckled under pressure from our allies and began to release inmates from Gitmo that we knew would probably take up arms again.

A helluva price to pay for bowing to political correctness.