Rasmussen Poll Watch: New Lows for Obama

Grim news for the White House in today's Rasmussen Poll as Obama's overall approval rating drops to a new low of 48%.  Ditto for his Approval Index, which stands, today, at -12, also a new low.

These new figures come in the milieu of press conferences and public appearances.  Whereas, in the past, such events tended to boost Obama's ratings, they clearly are not doing so today.  One might even argue that they are having the opposite effect, but the audience figures from Obama's last presser offers an alternative explanation (emphasis mine):


Audience interest in Barack Obama's news conferences seems to be falling, with Wednesday's press event drawing the president's smallest primetime audience since his inauguration.

The telecast to mark Obama's 100th day in office was viewed by 28.8 million people, according to Nielsen. That's a 29% drop from the president's last press conference, on March 24, and a 42% fall since his first, on Feb. 9.

Apparently, for a large number of Americans, matters have deteriorated beyond the point of not liking what they hear from the president, to the point where they no longer listen to him at all.

Richard Baehr comments; "He may need that beer tonight."
Grim news for the White House in today's Rasmussen Poll as Obama's overall approval rating drops to a new low of 48%.  Ditto for his Approval Index, which stands, today, at -12, also a new low.

These new figures come in the milieu of press conferences and public appearances.  Whereas, in the past, such events tended to boost Obama's ratings, they clearly are not doing so today.  One might even argue that they are having the opposite effect, but the audience figures from Obama's last presser offers an alternative explanation (emphasis mine):


Audience interest in Barack Obama's news conferences seems to be falling, with Wednesday's press event drawing the president's smallest primetime audience since his inauguration.

The telecast to mark Obama's 100th day in office was viewed by 28.8 million people, according to Nielsen. That's a 29% drop from the president's last press conference, on March 24, and a 42% fall since his first, on Feb. 9.

Apparently, for a large number of Americans, matters have deteriorated beyond the point of not liking what they hear from the president, to the point where they no longer listen to him at all.

Richard Baehr comments; "He may need that beer tonight."