Nearly All His Professors are Democrats

“Nearly All My Professors Are Democrats. Isn’t That a Problem?” is the title of a wonderful opinion piece at the Christian Science Monitor by University of Oregon journalism student Dan Lawton.

Lawton’s investigation into the liberally funded diversity program at the University of Oregon yielded some interesting results:

“The University of Oregon (UO), where I study journalism, invested millions annually in a diversity program that explicitly included "political affiliation" as a component. Yet, out of the 111 registered Oregon voters in the departments of journalism, law, political science, economics, and sociology, there were only two registered Republicans.”

When Lawton published his findings in the school newspaper he learned another lesson about the human face of liberal tolerance.  One female faculty member who confronted Lawton wasn’t too pleased with his investigation:

“From the disgust with which she attacked me, you would have thought I had advocated Nazism. She quickly grew so emotional that she had to leave the room. But before she departed, she stood over me and screamed.”

Why is Lawton’s essay a must read?  It can help to expose the strange and bizarre environment that shapes and coddles many of our liberal public servants.  In other words, it’s the environment where many people learn to stand over their political opponents and scream.

Liberal academia is also the incubation site for what might become America’s brave new socialist world.  It’s yet another reason Americans should take a second look at professors who decide to become politicians.


“Nearly All My Professors Are Democrats. Isn’t That a Problem?” is the title of a wonderful opinion piece at the Christian Science Monitor by University of Oregon journalism student Dan Lawton.

Lawton’s investigation into the liberally funded diversity program at the University of Oregon yielded some interesting results:

“The University of Oregon (UO), where I study journalism, invested millions annually in a diversity program that explicitly included "political affiliation" as a component. Yet, out of the 111 registered Oregon voters in the departments of journalism, law, political science, economics, and sociology, there were only two registered Republicans.”

When Lawton published his findings in the school newspaper he learned another lesson about the human face of liberal tolerance.  One female faculty member who confronted Lawton wasn’t too pleased with his investigation:

“From the disgust with which she attacked me, you would have thought I had advocated Nazism. She quickly grew so emotional that she had to leave the room. But before she departed, she stood over me and screamed.”

Why is Lawton’s essay a must read?  It can help to expose the strange and bizarre environment that shapes and coddles many of our liberal public servants.  In other words, it’s the environment where many people learn to stand over their political opponents and scream.

Liberal academia is also the incubation site for what might become America’s brave new socialist world.  It’s yet another reason Americans should take a second look at professors who decide to become politicians.