McConnell to vote "no" on Sotomayor

When you are the opposition, you must oppose."

Mitch McConnell appears to be taking Jennifer Rubin's adage to heart as his office announced that the Republican leader will oppose the nomination of Sonia Sotomayor to the Supreme Court:

McConnell gives his reasons in a press release outlining remarks he will make Monday on the senate floor:

"From the beginning of this confirmation process, I've said that Americans expect one thing when they walk into a court room, whether it's a traffic court or the Supreme Court - and that's equal treatment under the law. Over the years, Americans have accepted significant ideological differences in the kinds of men and women that various presidents have nominated to the Supreme Court. But one thing Americans will never tolerate in a nominee is a belief that some groups are more deserving of a fair shake than others. Nothing could be more offensive to the American sensibility than that. Judge Sotomayor is a fine person with an impressive story and a distinguished background. But above all else, a judge must check his or her personal or political agenda at the courtroom door and do justice even-handedly, as the judicial oath requires."

"Judge Sotomayor's record of written statements suggest an alarming lack of respect for the notion of equal justice, and therefore, in my view, an insufficient willingness to abide by the judicial oath. This is particularly important when considering someone for the Supreme Court since, if she were confirmed, there would be no higher court to deter or prevent her from injecting into the law the various disconcerting principles that recur throughout her public statements. For that reason, I will oppose her nomination."

He's not going to urge his fellow Republicans to vote with him in his remarks which reveals why McConnell is a poor leader. The GOP could do a lot to enforce party discipline on this but won't do it because of the political problems some members will have if they vote "no" on the nomination.

Besides, in the "get along, go along" senate, such arm twisting is usually frowned upon.

McConnel makes an excellent case for opposing Sotomayor. It's just a shame he doesn't have the leadership to bring the rest of the Republicans along with him.




When you are the opposition, you must oppose."

Mitch McConnell appears to be taking Jennifer Rubin's adage to heart as his office announced that the Republican leader will oppose the nomination of Sonia Sotomayor to the Supreme Court:

McConnell gives his reasons in a press release outlining remarks he will make Monday on the senate floor:

"From the beginning of this confirmation process, I've said that Americans expect one thing when they walk into a court room, whether it's a traffic court or the Supreme Court - and that's equal treatment under the law. Over the years, Americans have accepted significant ideological differences in the kinds of men and women that various presidents have nominated to the Supreme Court. But one thing Americans will never tolerate in a nominee is a belief that some groups are more deserving of a fair shake than others. Nothing could be more offensive to the American sensibility than that. Judge Sotomayor is a fine person with an impressive story and a distinguished background. But above all else, a judge must check his or her personal or political agenda at the courtroom door and do justice even-handedly, as the judicial oath requires."

"Judge Sotomayor's record of written statements suggest an alarming lack of respect for the notion of equal justice, and therefore, in my view, an insufficient willingness to abide by the judicial oath. This is particularly important when considering someone for the Supreme Court since, if she were confirmed, there would be no higher court to deter or prevent her from injecting into the law the various disconcerting principles that recur throughout her public statements. For that reason, I will oppose her nomination."

He's not going to urge his fellow Republicans to vote with him in his remarks which reveals why McConnell is a poor leader. The GOP could do a lot to enforce party discipline on this but won't do it because of the political problems some members will have if they vote "no" on the nomination.

Besides, in the "get along, go along" senate, such arm twisting is usually frowned upon.

McConnel makes an excellent case for opposing Sotomayor. It's just a shame he doesn't have the leadership to bring the rest of the Republicans along with him.