Is Obama Re-Establishing 'Black Street Cred?'

C. Edmund Wright
Nothing was as surreal about last night's press conference on healthcare as was the mention of the incident at Harvard regarding African American Studies Department Head Professor Gates and the "white cop." 

Not only did this seem oddly out of place, but it is instructive that the President admitted to both "not knowing the facts" yet obviously he sided with the black professor over the white cop. Allow me to submit the following theory: The President was trying to re-establish his "black street cred" a tad. As we know, black callers to radio shows like that of Al Sharpton have been getting disenchanted with the President. This was a perfect chance for the President to once again be "down for the struggle."

American Thinker first had the "black streed cred" theory in a March 14, 2008 blog, and was cited on talk radio, and then ended up on the Sunday TV Talk Shows.

Consider some excerpts from that blog in light of the new race firestorm started by the President last night:
Barack Obama sought out the message of Jeremiah Wright, joined and remained in and supported TUCC because of that message, and in fact named his book after a sermon of that message. He even used that message so that black voters in Chicago would not focus on the half of Obama that is white, and on his privileged Hawaiian education.  To paraphrase the good pastor, he "was riding dirty" on that message.

In other words, he embraced Wright and TUCC's agenda to get his black street cred and to escape his "white half." 

Jeremiah Wright is not simply a pastor who was assigned to Trinity United Church of Christ by a synod or diocese as the latest in a long line of such assignments. Jeremiah Wright is the TUCC.  These churches exist for the sole purpose of spreading the pastor's specific ministry. If there is a market for such a ministry (and in Chicago there has been one), then the church will grow. Being an active member and significant benefactor of such a church for 20 years is by natural extension an endorsement of the pastor's message.  

The Professor Gates portion of the press conference last night was nothing if not an appeal to the street. It was right out of the play-book -- or tape collection -- of Reverend Jeremiah Wright.  It was the America that deserves damning.

Update -- Rosslyn Smith adds:

   Rasmussen released this on Wednesday. 
 
While most African-American voters (56%) still say the country is heading in the right direction, that’s down seven points over the past week. Only 28% of white voters agree, showing no change from the previous survey. A quarter (25%) of all other voters says the country is headed in the right direction this week, down three points.
Nothing was as surreal about last night's press conference on healthcare as was the mention of the incident at Harvard regarding African American Studies Department Head Professor Gates and the "white cop." 

Not only did this seem oddly out of place, but it is instructive that the President admitted to both "not knowing the facts" yet obviously he sided with the black professor over the white cop. Allow me to submit the following theory: The President was trying to re-establish his "black street cred" a tad. As we know, black callers to radio shows like that of Al Sharpton have been getting disenchanted with the President. This was a perfect chance for the President to once again be "down for the struggle."

American Thinker first had the "black streed cred" theory in a March 14, 2008 blog, and was cited on talk radio, and then ended up on the Sunday TV Talk Shows.

Consider some excerpts from that blog in light of the new race firestorm started by the President last night:
Barack Obama sought out the message of Jeremiah Wright, joined and remained in and supported TUCC because of that message, and in fact named his book after a sermon of that message. He even used that message so that black voters in Chicago would not focus on the half of Obama that is white, and on his privileged Hawaiian education.  To paraphrase the good pastor, he "was riding dirty" on that message.

In other words, he embraced Wright and TUCC's agenda to get his black street cred and to escape his "white half." 

Jeremiah Wright is not simply a pastor who was assigned to Trinity United Church of Christ by a synod or diocese as the latest in a long line of such assignments. Jeremiah Wright is the TUCC.  These churches exist for the sole purpose of spreading the pastor's specific ministry. If there is a market for such a ministry (and in Chicago there has been one), then the church will grow. Being an active member and significant benefactor of such a church for 20 years is by natural extension an endorsement of the pastor's message.  

The Professor Gates portion of the press conference last night was nothing if not an appeal to the street. It was right out of the play-book -- or tape collection -- of Reverend Jeremiah Wright.  It was the America that deserves damning.

Update -- Rosslyn Smith adds:

   Rasmussen released this on Wednesday. 
 
While most African-American voters (56%) still say the country is heading in the right direction, that’s down seven points over the past week. Only 28% of white voters agree, showing no change from the previous survey. A quarter (25%) of all other voters says the country is headed in the right direction this week, down three points.