Expect Sanford Resignation soon

We at AT have barely covered the story of Mark Sanford's infidelity because frankly, what's there to report? He fooled around on his wife - not the first politician to do so. The left got their panties in a twist over the "hypocrisy" of it all - again, no news there. We figured that South Carolina is perfectly capable of handling the situation whatever way they saw fit.

And now it appears that a consensus is forming that Sanford has got to go. The final straw appears to have been an AP interview where the governor admitted additional liasons and other "incidents" with other women.

The pros in the Palmetto State have now calculated that Sanford is dead weight on the party and should step down according to this story by Andy Barr and Jonathan Martin in Politico:

While Sanford seemed to have weathered the storm in the brutal days immediately following his admission of an affair with an Argentine woman, his support has cratered in the wake of the AP interview in which he talked of his "tragic" and "forbidden" love for his "soul mate" and admitted to having "crossed lines" with a handful of other women.

Fourteen GOP state senators - more than half the Senate Republican caucus - have already called for Sanford's resignation, joining a list that, as of Wednesday afternoon, included 11 Republican members of the state House and six of the state's biggest newspapers.

And three leading South Carolina Republican officeholders, including the state's two U.S. senators, called Sanford today for what sources close to the lawmakers described as frank conversations about the governor's ability to carry out his job.

Sens. Jim DeMint and Lindsey Graham, as well as Rep. Gresham Barrett, talked to Sanford Wednesday, according to three top South Carolina GOP sources who confirmed the calls, but were hesitant to say whether the lawmakers had directly urged Sanford to resign.

Wednesday, according to three top South Carolina GOP sources who confirmed the calls, but were hesitant to say whether the lawmakers had directly urged Sanford to resign
Barrett, who is running for governor next year, confirmed to AP he had asked the governor to step down.

Sanford had been mentioned as a long shot candidate for president in 2012 but realistically, he had little chance. It was his voice for fiscal sanity and his historic stand against taking federal stimulus money that made him an important figure in the party. He can still be that voice - if he can get his life back together.
We at AT have barely covered the story of Mark Sanford's infidelity because frankly, what's there to report? He fooled around on his wife - not the first politician to do so. The left got their panties in a twist over the "hypocrisy" of it all - again, no news there. We figured that South Carolina is perfectly capable of handling the situation whatever way they saw fit.

And now it appears that a consensus is forming that Sanford has got to go. The final straw appears to have been an AP interview where the governor admitted additional liasons and other "incidents" with other women.

The pros in the Palmetto State have now calculated that Sanford is dead weight on the party and should step down according to this story by Andy Barr and Jonathan Martin in Politico:

While Sanford seemed to have weathered the storm in the brutal days immediately following his admission of an affair with an Argentine woman, his support has cratered in the wake of the AP interview in which he talked of his "tragic" and "forbidden" love for his "soul mate" and admitted to having "crossed lines" with a handful of other women.

Fourteen GOP state senators - more than half the Senate Republican caucus - have already called for Sanford's resignation, joining a list that, as of Wednesday afternoon, included 11 Republican members of the state House and six of the state's biggest newspapers.

And three leading South Carolina Republican officeholders, including the state's two U.S. senators, called Sanford today for what sources close to the lawmakers described as frank conversations about the governor's ability to carry out his job.

Sens. Jim DeMint and Lindsey Graham, as well as Rep. Gresham Barrett, talked to Sanford Wednesday, according to three top South Carolina GOP sources who confirmed the calls, but were hesitant to say whether the lawmakers had directly urged Sanford to resign.

Wednesday, according to three top South Carolina GOP sources who confirmed the calls, but were hesitant to say whether the lawmakers had directly urged Sanford to resign
Barrett, who is running for governor next year, confirmed to AP he had asked the governor to step down.

Sanford had been mentioned as a long shot candidate for president in 2012 but realistically, he had little chance. It was his voice for fiscal sanity and his historic stand against taking federal stimulus money that made him an important figure in the party. He can still be that voice - if he can get his life back together.