Back to school?

Cliff Thier
Another prudential reason for Sarah Palin to resign (assuming she's considering a race for President) is to read every economics, history and policy book she can get her hands on.

Republican candidates get grilled about the most obscure facts.

"Mrs. Palin, who won the Battle of Westphalia?"

"Charles, you must mean 'who won the Battle of Tuttlingen,' don't you? Or, did you mean to ask me 'who won the Battle of Frieburg?' I don't think you meant to ask about the Battle of Olmutz, right?"

"No. I have it right here. Westphalia!"

"Charles, there was a Congress of Westphalia, in 1644. . . ."

"Well, let's move on to stem cell research. Sarah, as President you'll need to understand the difference between totipotent and oligopotent stem cells. Perhaps you can tell the voters how you would deal with that difference."

"How much time to we have, Charles?"

"Actually, I think voters want to know if you believe more in the economic policies advocated by Joseph Schumpeter or by Milton Friedman?"

"You betcha. I'd love to, Charles. Let's see, Schumpeter is best known . . . ."

Democratic candidates will get somewhat less probing questions:

"President Obama, is it difficult to buy the First Lady an anniversary present?"
Another prudential reason for Sarah Palin to resign (assuming she's considering a race for President) is to read every economics, history and policy book she can get her hands on.

Republican candidates get grilled about the most obscure facts.

"Mrs. Palin, who won the Battle of Westphalia?"

"Charles, you must mean 'who won the Battle of Tuttlingen,' don't you? Or, did you mean to ask me 'who won the Battle of Frieburg?' I don't think you meant to ask about the Battle of Olmutz, right?"

"No. I have it right here. Westphalia!"

"Charles, there was a Congress of Westphalia, in 1644. . . ."

"Well, let's move on to stem cell research. Sarah, as President you'll need to understand the difference between totipotent and oligopotent stem cells. Perhaps you can tell the voters how you would deal with that difference."

"How much time to we have, Charles?"

"Actually, I think voters want to know if you believe more in the economic policies advocated by Joseph Schumpeter or by Milton Friedman?"

"You betcha. I'd love to, Charles. Let's see, Schumpeter is best known . . . ."

Democratic candidates will get somewhat less probing questions:

"President Obama, is it difficult to buy the First Lady an anniversary present?"