America Souring on Hope and Change

Clarice Feldman
As if we were speaking another language, the Democrats are ignoring all the signs that they are overstepping in expanding the federal government and spending like there's no tomorrow:

The first signs of a revolt are apparent in the polls.

President Barack Obama's approval rating in the Buckeye State - one of the key bellwethers for national politics - dropped to 49 percent, the lowest of any swing state, according to a poll released Tuesday by Quinnipiac University in Hamden, Conn. Obama, who lost Ohio's Democratic primary to Hillary Rodham Clinton but topped Republican John McCain in November's general election, earned a 62 percent approval rating in the university's May survey.

More, from the Washington Examiner:
Last month's Washington Post/ABC poll reported that Americans favor smaller government with fewer services to larger government with more services by a 54 to 41 percent margin -- a slight uptick since 2004. The percentage of Independents favoring small government rose to 61 percent from 52 percent in 2008. The June NBC/Wall Street Journal poll reported that, even amid recession, 58 percent worry more about keeping the budget deficit down versus 35 percent worried more about boosting the economy. A similar question in the June CBS/New York Times poll showed a 52 to 41 percent split.

Other polls show a resistance to specific Democratic proposals. Pollster Whit Ayres reports that 58 percent of voters agree that reforming health care, while important, should be done without raising taxes or increasing the deficit. Pollster Scott Rasmussen reports that 56 percent of Americans are unwilling to pay more in taxes or utility rates to generate cleaner energy and fight global warming.

It's interesting that on these issues and many others independents are responding more like Republicans than Democrats. That's the opposite of what we saw up through 2008, when independents were almost as critical of the Bush administration and Republican policies as Democrats.

This apparent recoil against big government policies has not gone unnoticed by Americans. Gallup reported earlier this week that 39 percent of Americans say their views on political issues have grown more conservative, while only 18 say they have grown more liberal. Moderates agreed by a 33 to 18 percent margin.

Rasmussen also reflects the public disillusionment.

In the past, it seems Obama was able to get some bounce with travels overseas and the attendant shots of waving crowds and fancy diplo-stepping in gilded foreign palaces, but as Ann Althouse shows us, even that can backfire, as the Russians seemingly deliberately humiliated him.
As if we were speaking another language, the Democrats are ignoring all the signs that they are overstepping in expanding the federal government and spending like there's no tomorrow:

The first signs of a revolt are apparent in the polls.

President Barack Obama's approval rating in the Buckeye State - one of the key bellwethers for national politics - dropped to 49 percent, the lowest of any swing state, according to a poll released Tuesday by Quinnipiac University in Hamden, Conn. Obama, who lost Ohio's Democratic primary to Hillary Rodham Clinton but topped Republican John McCain in November's general election, earned a 62 percent approval rating in the university's May survey.

More, from the Washington Examiner:
Last month's Washington Post/ABC poll reported that Americans favor smaller government with fewer services to larger government with more services by a 54 to 41 percent margin -- a slight uptick since 2004. The percentage of Independents favoring small government rose to 61 percent from 52 percent in 2008. The June NBC/Wall Street Journal poll reported that, even amid recession, 58 percent worry more about keeping the budget deficit down versus 35 percent worried more about boosting the economy. A similar question in the June CBS/New York Times poll showed a 52 to 41 percent split.

Other polls show a resistance to specific Democratic proposals. Pollster Whit Ayres reports that 58 percent of voters agree that reforming health care, while important, should be done without raising taxes or increasing the deficit. Pollster Scott Rasmussen reports that 56 percent of Americans are unwilling to pay more in taxes or utility rates to generate cleaner energy and fight global warming.

It's interesting that on these issues and many others independents are responding more like Republicans than Democrats. That's the opposite of what we saw up through 2008, when independents were almost as critical of the Bush administration and Republican policies as Democrats.

This apparent recoil against big government policies has not gone unnoticed by Americans. Gallup reported earlier this week that 39 percent of Americans say their views on political issues have grown more conservative, while only 18 say they have grown more liberal. Moderates agreed by a 33 to 18 percent margin.

Rasmussen also reflects the public disillusionment.

In the past, it seems Obama was able to get some bounce with travels overseas and the attendant shots of waving crowds and fancy diplo-stepping in gilded foreign palaces, but as Ann Althouse shows us, even that can backfire, as the Russians seemingly deliberately humiliated him.