US charges couple with spying for Castro

A former State Department analyst and his wife used a short wave transmitter to pass diplomatic secrets to Cuba for 30 years, according to charges filed by the Justice department.

Evidently, they spied because they had an "affinity for Cuba" and not for money, according to Eric Lichtblau's report on the New York Times:

Officials said the couple, Walter K. Myers, 72, and Gwendolyn S. Myers, 71, received little in the way of compensation from the Cubans except for the short-wave radio and some travel expenses. Rather, the officials said, the couple appears to have been driven by their strong affinity for Cuba and their bitterness toward "American imperialism."

"We think they did it because they love Cuba," said a law enforcement official who spoke on condition of anonymity because he was not authorized to discuss the case.

The Myerses, who live in Washington, were arrested on Thursday and charged in a grand jury indictment unsealed Friday with serving as illegal agents of the Cuban government and wire fraud. A defense lawyer declined to comment on the charges.

The case had been under investigation for three years but intensified two months ago, when an undercover agent of the Federal Bureau of Investigation, posing as a Cuban agent, approached Mr. Myers. That led to a series of meetings in which the Justice Department said that Mr. Myers and his wife made incriminating admissions about their decades-long work for Cuba.

The couple visited Cuba in 1979 on an academic exchange and according to diary entries, immediately fell in love with Cuba and their "revolutionary goals" while hating the fact America was indifferent to social programs like universal health care. "Cuba is so exciting!" wrote Meyers, adding that "the revolution has released enormous potential and liberated the Cuban spirit."

Poor deluded fool.


A former State Department analyst and his wife used a short wave transmitter to pass diplomatic secrets to Cuba for 30 years, according to charges filed by the Justice department.

Evidently, they spied because they had an "affinity for Cuba" and not for money, according to Eric Lichtblau's report on the New York Times:

Officials said the couple, Walter K. Myers, 72, and Gwendolyn S. Myers, 71, received little in the way of compensation from the Cubans except for the short-wave radio and some travel expenses. Rather, the officials said, the couple appears to have been driven by their strong affinity for Cuba and their bitterness toward "American imperialism."

"We think they did it because they love Cuba," said a law enforcement official who spoke on condition of anonymity because he was not authorized to discuss the case.

The Myerses, who live in Washington, were arrested on Thursday and charged in a grand jury indictment unsealed Friday with serving as illegal agents of the Cuban government and wire fraud. A defense lawyer declined to comment on the charges.

The case had been under investigation for three years but intensified two months ago, when an undercover agent of the Federal Bureau of Investigation, posing as a Cuban agent, approached Mr. Myers. That led to a series of meetings in which the Justice Department said that Mr. Myers and his wife made incriminating admissions about their decades-long work for Cuba.

The couple visited Cuba in 1979 on an academic exchange and according to diary entries, immediately fell in love with Cuba and their "revolutionary goals" while hating the fact America was indifferent to social programs like universal health care. "Cuba is so exciting!" wrote Meyers, adding that "the revolution has released enormous potential and liberated the Cuban spirit."

Poor deluded fool.