To Meddle, Or Not To Meddle

Randall Hoven
President Obama wants to make sure he is not seen as meddling in Iran.  But apparently, it is quite OK to meddle in Honduras.  The Wall Street Journal reports   

The Obama administration worked in recent days to prevent President Manuel Zelaya's ouster, said a senior U.S. official. The State Department, in particular, communicated to Honduran officials on the ground that President Barack Obama wouldn't support any nondemocratic transfer of power in the Central American country.

"We had some indication that a move against Mr. Zelaya was afoot," said a U.S. official briefed on the diplomacy. "We made it clear it was something we didn't support."

When it came to Iran, Obama didn't want to meddle.

But there is a common denominator:  President Obama does whatever it takes to keep anti-American dictators in power.  In Iran: don't meddle.  In Honduras: meddle.  In Venezuela: soul shake.  In Saudi Arabia: bow.
President Obama wants to make sure he is not seen as meddling in Iran.  But apparently, it is quite OK to meddle in Honduras.  The Wall Street Journal reports   

The Obama administration worked in recent days to prevent President Manuel Zelaya's ouster, said a senior U.S. official. The State Department, in particular, communicated to Honduran officials on the ground that President Barack Obama wouldn't support any nondemocratic transfer of power in the Central American country.

"We had some indication that a move against Mr. Zelaya was afoot," said a U.S. official briefed on the diplomacy. "We made it clear it was something we didn't support."

When it came to Iran, Obama didn't want to meddle.

But there is a common denominator:  President Obama does whatever it takes to keep anti-American dictators in power.  In Iran: don't meddle.  In Honduras: meddle.  In Venezuela: soul shake.  In Saudi Arabia: bow.