SCOTUS lets Plame suit die

By
While we breathlessly await the movie about the deeds of derring do performed by Valerie Plame and her husband Joe Wilson, the end of the film has already been written; no satisfaction in court for the formerly dynamic duo.

The Supreme Court let stand a lower court ruling that tossed out a suit by Plame/Wilson against Dick Cheney, Scooter Libby, and 9 others that contended the pair were damaged professionally and personally by the "outing" of Plame.

This Fox News summary by Lee Ross has some golden quotes:

The Wilsons said their case was about "abuse of power at the highest level of American government." 

They claim the senior Bush administration officials orchestrated a campaign to leak Plame's name to reporters in an effort to compromise her status as a covert CIA agent. This was supposedly done as retribution for a 2003 New York Times column her husband authored about Iraq's nuclear ambitions and that country's relations with Niger.

The Wilsons' claimed that Plame's blown cover made them a target for people with hostile views against the United States. They also contend the circumstance of her outing resulted in the suffering of "gross invasions of privacy."

The couple sued seeking unspecified financial damages but their lawsuit was dismissed by a federal trial court judge. That decision that was upheld last year by an appellate court. Monday's ruling by the Supreme Court, made as usual without comment, leaves the lower court rulings in place.

For these two publicity hounds to claim that they suffered a "gross invasion of privacy" as a result of her name being published is hilarious. The "invasion" that took place was of these two celebrity seekers showing their face anywhere and everywhere until we were sick of the sight of them.

Wilson, a proven liar, will now disappear into obscurity along with his wife. That is, until we see them attending the premiere of their movie that will be based on Plame's book (if it ever comes out) for which she reportedly received an advance of $2.5 million.
While we breathlessly await the movie about the deeds of derring do performed by Valerie Plame and her husband Joe Wilson, the end of the film has already been written; no satisfaction in court for the formerly dynamic duo.

The Supreme Court let stand a lower court ruling that tossed out a suit by Plame/Wilson against Dick Cheney, Scooter Libby, and 9 others that contended the pair were damaged professionally and personally by the "outing" of Plame.

This Fox News summary by Lee Ross has some golden quotes:

The Wilsons said their case was about "abuse of power at the highest level of American government." 

They claim the senior Bush administration officials orchestrated a campaign to leak Plame's name to reporters in an effort to compromise her status as a covert CIA agent. This was supposedly done as retribution for a 2003 New York Times column her husband authored about Iraq's nuclear ambitions and that country's relations with Niger.

The Wilsons' claimed that Plame's blown cover made them a target for people with hostile views against the United States. They also contend the circumstance of her outing resulted in the suffering of "gross invasions of privacy."

The couple sued seeking unspecified financial damages but their lawsuit was dismissed by a federal trial court judge. That decision that was upheld last year by an appellate court. Monday's ruling by the Supreme Court, made as usual without comment, leaves the lower court rulings in place.

For these two publicity hounds to claim that they suffered a "gross invasion of privacy" as a result of her name being published is hilarious. The "invasion" that took place was of these two celebrity seekers showing their face anywhere and everywhere until we were sick of the sight of them.

Wilson, a proven liar, will now disappear into obscurity along with his wife. That is, until we see them attending the premiere of their movie that will be based on Plame's book (if it ever comes out) for which she reportedly received an advance of $2.5 million.