Reporters and their mindset

David Paulin
A group of "Concerned Reporters at The Boston Globe" has written a naive letter to Pinch Sulzberger pleading for his help in keeping the paper alive and their bills paid. It's  what you'd expect, I guess, from politically liberal and idealistic kids who think they're doing very noble work and are thus above the harsh realities of the real world -- in respect to the people (Sulzberger) and economic realities (the dying newspaper industry) that they're dealing with.

The same kinds of folks who, after getting jobs in the State Department, think they can go to Saddam's Iraq or extremist Iran and strike deals that are in everybody's interest -- if only they are respectful and reasonable.
A group of "Concerned Reporters at The Boston Globe" has written a naive letter to Pinch Sulzberger pleading for his help in keeping the paper alive and their bills paid. It's  what you'd expect, I guess, from politically liberal and idealistic kids who think they're doing very noble work and are thus above the harsh realities of the real world -- in respect to the people (Sulzberger) and economic realities (the dying newspaper industry) that they're dealing with.

The same kinds of folks who, after getting jobs in the State Department, think they can go to Saddam's Iraq or extremist Iran and strike deals that are in everybody's interest -- if only they are respectful and reasonable.