Pay no attention to the man behind the curtain

". . . the Great And Powerful Obama has spoken."

Even George W. Bush, supposedly not as smart as Obama, didn't find it necessary to have one teleprompter at his press conferences—let alone the two that the Wizard of Obama needs at his press conferences.

There is no reason to have teleprompters at press conferences other than for someone—most likely a team of specialists sitting at keyboards—to be feeding the Great and Wonderful President of Obama answers to journalists' questions.

"Okay, everybody. Get ready. If it's a question on health care I got that one. If it's on Iran, Susan you take it. And, Tim, if it's on taxes, don't take so long to type your answer this time."

The question that our fearless press should have asked months ago is: who is pulling the levers behind the curtains? Who is putting the words in the Wizard's mouth? 

Why isn't the Great and Powerful (and intelligent and articulate) Obama up to answering questions himself?
". . . the Great And Powerful Obama has spoken."

Even George W. Bush, supposedly not as smart as Obama, didn't find it necessary to have one teleprompter at his press conferences—let alone the two that the Wizard of Obama needs at his press conferences.

There is no reason to have teleprompters at press conferences other than for someone—most likely a team of specialists sitting at keyboards—to be feeding the Great and Wonderful President of Obama answers to journalists' questions.

"Okay, everybody. Get ready. If it's a question on health care I got that one. If it's on Iran, Susan you take it. And, Tim, if it's on taxes, don't take so long to type your answer this time."

The question that our fearless press should have asked months ago is: who is pulling the levers behind the curtains? Who is putting the words in the Wizard's mouth? 

Why isn't the Great and Powerful (and intelligent and articulate) Obama up to answering questions himself?