MSM: Sotomayor's experience good; Obama's inexperience good

Ben-Peter Terpstra
Time Magazine sneered at concern that Obama during the election campaign last year. David Von Drehle wrote in the March 10, 2008 issue:
 Does Experience Matter in a President?

Hillary Clinton and John McCain are arguing that Barack Obama is too green for the job.  But history shows that when it comes to the presidency experience doesn't guarantee success.  [snip]

Wouldn't it be nice if time on the job and tickets punched translated neatly into superior performance? Then finding great Presidents would be a simple matter of weighing résumés.

In the same edition, John Cloud reinforced the point in an article titled The Science of Experience

Would you prefer a doctor who practiced medicine for 30 years or just 10? Research into expert performance shows that the choice isn't simple.

Now the Obama-first media and Obama (bizarrely enough) argues that experience counts more than ever (May 26, 2009):

WASHINGTON (CNN) -- President Obama on Tuesday nominated federal appellate Judge Sonia Sotomayor to the U.S. Supreme Court.

If confirmed, Sotomayor, 54, would be the first Hispanic U.S. Supreme Court justice and the third woman to serve on the high court.

Sotomayor "is an inspiring woman who I believe will make a great justice," Obama said at a White House announcement.

She "has worked at almost every level of our judicial system, providing her with a depth of experience and a breadth of perspective that will be invaluable as a Supreme Court justice," he added.

Obama said Sotomayor would bring more experience on the bench than anyone currently serving on the Supreme Court when appointed.

Today's media spin: How dare you question her "experience"? Experience is all.
Time Magazine sneered at concern that Obama during the election campaign last year. David Von Drehle wrote in the March 10, 2008 issue:
 Does Experience Matter in a President?

Hillary Clinton and John McCain are arguing that Barack Obama is too green for the job.  But history shows that when it comes to the presidency experience doesn't guarantee success.  [snip]

Wouldn't it be nice if time on the job and tickets punched translated neatly into superior performance? Then finding great Presidents would be a simple matter of weighing résumés.

In the same edition, John Cloud reinforced the point in an article titled The Science of Experience

Would you prefer a doctor who practiced medicine for 30 years or just 10? Research into expert performance shows that the choice isn't simple.

Now the Obama-first media and Obama (bizarrely enough) argues that experience counts more than ever (May 26, 2009):

WASHINGTON (CNN) -- President Obama on Tuesday nominated federal appellate Judge Sonia Sotomayor to the U.S. Supreme Court.

If confirmed, Sotomayor, 54, would be the first Hispanic U.S. Supreme Court justice and the third woman to serve on the high court.

Sotomayor "is an inspiring woman who I believe will make a great justice," Obama said at a White House announcement.

She "has worked at almost every level of our judicial system, providing her with a depth of experience and a breadth of perspective that will be invaluable as a Supreme Court justice," he added.

Obama said Sotomayor would bring more experience on the bench than anyone currently serving on the Supreme Court when appointed.

Today's media spin: How dare you question her "experience"? Experience is all.