Gee, Mr. President. Ya think?

Our Commander in Chief appears to have finally figured out that negotiations with the thugs in Tehran may have to be delayed - at least until a decent interval of time has passed and people forget Neda and the other demonstrators mowed down in cold blood.

I'm sure he'd rather not. But when many members of his own party start calling him out for being a weak kneed buttercup as far as taking on the Iranian regime, he probably feels he has little choice.

Jeff Zeleny's piece in the New York Times has the details:

President Obama, whose campaign for the White House included a pledge to open talks with Iran, said Friday that the prospects for such a dialogue had been dampened by the brutal crackdown in the wake of the nation's disputed presidential election.

At a White House news conference with the German chancellor, Angela Merkel, Mr. Obama intensified his reproach of Iran's government and called for an end to deadly attacks against its people. He also engaged in an unusual exchange with President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad, brushing aside a suggestion that he apologize for criticizing Iran.

"I would suggest that Mr. Ahmadinejad think carefully about the obligations he owes to his own people," Mr. Obama said. "And he might want to consider looking at the families of those who've been beaten or shot or detained."

With Ms. Merkel at his side, Mr. Obama delivered some of his most pointed remarks against Iran since the violent protests began two weeks ago. Ms. Merkel said Germany and other nations shared his view, saying, "Iran cannot count on the world turning a blind eye."

Considering that this is exactly what Obama has been doing - "turning a blind eye" to the regime's brutality, it is almost surreal coming from a guy who keeps insisting his rhetoric on Iran hasn't changed.

The mullahs seem to have gotten the upper hand, at least temporarily. The "Day of the Axes" on Thursday may have done more to keep the protestors off the streets than anything they've tried yet. But Mousavi seems unwilling to give up the fight yet and we should expect more efforts to demonstrate in the next few days.


Our Commander in Chief appears to have finally figured out that negotiations with the thugs in Tehran may have to be delayed - at least until a decent interval of time has passed and people forget Neda and the other demonstrators mowed down in cold blood.

I'm sure he'd rather not. But when many members of his own party start calling him out for being a weak kneed buttercup as far as taking on the Iranian regime, he probably feels he has little choice.

Jeff Zeleny's piece in the New York Times has the details:

President Obama, whose campaign for the White House included a pledge to open talks with Iran, said Friday that the prospects for such a dialogue had been dampened by the brutal crackdown in the wake of the nation's disputed presidential election.

At a White House news conference with the German chancellor, Angela Merkel, Mr. Obama intensified his reproach of Iran's government and called for an end to deadly attacks against its people. He also engaged in an unusual exchange with President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad, brushing aside a suggestion that he apologize for criticizing Iran.

"I would suggest that Mr. Ahmadinejad think carefully about the obligations he owes to his own people," Mr. Obama said. "And he might want to consider looking at the families of those who've been beaten or shot or detained."

With Ms. Merkel at his side, Mr. Obama delivered some of his most pointed remarks against Iran since the violent protests began two weeks ago. Ms. Merkel said Germany and other nations shared his view, saying, "Iran cannot count on the world turning a blind eye."

Considering that this is exactly what Obama has been doing - "turning a blind eye" to the regime's brutality, it is almost surreal coming from a guy who keeps insisting his rhetoric on Iran hasn't changed.

The mullahs seem to have gotten the upper hand, at least temporarily. The "Day of the Axes" on Thursday may have done more to keep the protestors off the streets than anything they've tried yet. But Mousavi seems unwilling to give up the fight yet and we should expect more efforts to demonstrate in the next few days.