Barry Rubin on Obama's speech

Rick Moran
Barack Obama's speech in Cairo is one of the most bizarre orations ever made by a U.S. president, not a foreign policy statement but rather something invented by Obama, an international campaign speech, as if his main goal was to obtain votes in the next Egyptian primary. (Barry Rubin)

Dr. Barry Rubin, director of the Global Research in International Affairs (GLORIA ) Center and editor of the Middle East Review of International Affairs (MERIA) Journal, has a fantastic take on Obama's speech from yesterday:

Here, Obama followed the idea that if you want someone to like you agree with almost everything he says. Obama also gave, albeit with some minor variations, the speech that the leader of a Third World Muslim country might give, justifying it in advance by claiming America is a big Muslim country, after all.

Of course, the speech had tremendous-though temporary-appeal combined with its counterproductive strategic impact. It will make him more popular. It may well make America somewhat less unpopular. But its effect on Middle East issues and U.S. interests is another matter entirely.

The first problem is that Obama said many things factually quite untrue, some ridiculously so. Pages would be required to list all these inaccuracies. The interesting question is whether Obama consciously lied or really believes it. I'd prefer him to be lying, because if he's that ignorant then America and the world is in very deep trouble.

If he really believes Islam's social role is so perfect, radical Islamists are a tiny minority, Palestinians have suffered hugely through no fault of their own, and so on, then he's living in a fantasy world. Unfortunately, we are not. The collision between reality and dream is going to be a terrible one.

Read the rest of the piece for some interesting insights into Obama's thinking including this chilling  statement from Rubin:

the mainstream in the region will say, "We were right all the time. Obama admitted it!" While more extreme radicals say, "We've won and America's surrendering."

Obama's speech has empowered the very people he was seeking to marginalize.

Hat Tip: Richard Baehr



Barack Obama's speech in Cairo is one of the most bizarre orations ever made by a U.S. president, not a foreign policy statement but rather something invented by Obama, an international campaign speech, as if his main goal was to obtain votes in the next Egyptian primary. (Barry Rubin)

Dr. Barry Rubin, director of the Global Research in International Affairs (GLORIA ) Center and editor of the Middle East Review of International Affairs (MERIA) Journal, has a fantastic take on Obama's speech from yesterday:

Here, Obama followed the idea that if you want someone to like you agree with almost everything he says. Obama also gave, albeit with some minor variations, the speech that the leader of a Third World Muslim country might give, justifying it in advance by claiming America is a big Muslim country, after all.

Of course, the speech had tremendous-though temporary-appeal combined with its counterproductive strategic impact. It will make him more popular. It may well make America somewhat less unpopular. But its effect on Middle East issues and U.S. interests is another matter entirely.

The first problem is that Obama said many things factually quite untrue, some ridiculously so. Pages would be required to list all these inaccuracies. The interesting question is whether Obama consciously lied or really believes it. I'd prefer him to be lying, because if he's that ignorant then America and the world is in very deep trouble.

If he really believes Islam's social role is so perfect, radical Islamists are a tiny minority, Palestinians have suffered hugely through no fault of their own, and so on, then he's living in a fantasy world. Unfortunately, we are not. The collision between reality and dream is going to be a terrible one.

Read the rest of the piece for some interesting insights into Obama's thinking including this chilling  statement from Rubin:

the mainstream in the region will say, "We were right all the time. Obama admitted it!" While more extreme radicals say, "We've won and America's surrendering."

Obama's speech has empowered the very people he was seeking to marginalize.

Hat Tip: Richard Baehr