Ayers and Dohrn on C-SPAN

Matthew May
Many thanks to Peter Barry Chowka for patiently sitting through C-SPAN's airing of William Ayers so the rest of us did not have to subject ourselves to Ayres and his preening nonsense. A few notes on BookTV's format from a former employee of C-SPAN:

It is quite common for BookTV to air such a program during a literary fest such as the Chicago Tribune's Printers Row festival. However, it is not as common for the network to air three hours of the In Depth program without opening the phone lines to a flood of callers to ask questions of the guest so that they may challenge him or her, and offer opportunities to elaborate on passages from books and articles.

As to the relative anonymity of the interviewer, that is par for the course for the network. The interviewer at C-SPAN, whether it is Brian Lamb or one of the lesser-known on-air employees acts as a facilitator. The goal is to stay as impartial as possible, to let the guest being interviewed have the chance to explain himself or herself in a way seemingly prohibited on the cable net chat shows. The idea is that the guest can prove his or her point or hoist himself or herself on their own petard, as is the case with the gruesome twosome of Ayers and Dohrn.

It is disturbing to see people like Ayers and Dorhn given so much airtime, but it is part of the service C-SPAN provides. We can see, unfiltered, this shifty-eyed degenerate and his cohort for what they are.

While we are at it, let's utilize the C-SPAN website to deluge  the network with the suggestion that they set up a program wherein Mr. Ayers has the opportunity to answer the questions and challenges posed by one Jack Cashill.
Many thanks to Peter Barry Chowka for patiently sitting through C-SPAN's airing of William Ayers so the rest of us did not have to subject ourselves to Ayres and his preening nonsense. A few notes on BookTV's format from a former employee of C-SPAN:

It is quite common for BookTV to air such a program during a literary fest such as the Chicago Tribune's Printers Row festival. However, it is not as common for the network to air three hours of the In Depth program without opening the phone lines to a flood of callers to ask questions of the guest so that they may challenge him or her, and offer opportunities to elaborate on passages from books and articles.

As to the relative anonymity of the interviewer, that is par for the course for the network. The interviewer at C-SPAN, whether it is Brian Lamb or one of the lesser-known on-air employees acts as a facilitator. The goal is to stay as impartial as possible, to let the guest being interviewed have the chance to explain himself or herself in a way seemingly prohibited on the cable net chat shows. The idea is that the guest can prove his or her point or hoist himself or herself on their own petard, as is the case with the gruesome twosome of Ayers and Dohrn.

It is disturbing to see people like Ayers and Dorhn given so much airtime, but it is part of the service C-SPAN provides. We can see, unfiltered, this shifty-eyed degenerate and his cohort for what they are.

While we are at it, let's utilize the C-SPAN website to deluge  the network with the suggestion that they set up a program wherein Mr. Ayers has the opportunity to answer the questions and challenges posed by one Jack Cashill.