AG Holder doesn't care about voter intimidation

Rick Moran
Politicize the Justice Department? Who? Where?

Acting with the knowledge that the press will never call them out on it as they would have if the Bush administration attempted anything remotely like this, Attorney General Holder's office is turning a blind eye toward voters rights issues.

This piece in the Wall Street Journal by Hans Spakovsky provides the details:

Justice's inexplicable dismissal of a civil lawsuit for voter intimidation against the New Black Panther Party. The Black Panthers weren't content to endorse Barack Obama. They sent their members to the polls last November to "patrol election sites." Fox News aired a video of two Black Panthers in military-style uniforms in a Philadelphia precinct. One of them was carrying a nightstick.

[...]

Justice recently stopped Georgia from implementing a key provision of the Help America Vote Act. Passed in 2002, the act requires states to verify the accuracy of information voters provide on their registration forms by comparing it with state driver's license and Social Security records -- a sensible requirement. With input from Justice Department lawyers in 2008, Georgia implemented this verification process, including checking the citizenship status of applicants. It is a violation of federal and state law for a noncitizen to register and vote in federal and state elections.

Under Georgia's program, anyone flagged as a potential noncitizen would still be registered if he could confirm to local election officials that he was indeed a citizen. Georgia sent letters to over 4,000 potential noncitizens. More than 2,000 failed to confirm their citizenship, strong evidence that noncitizens were prevented from illegally registering and voting.

Then there's the case in Missouri where 13 counties have more people registered to vote than there are voting age adults living in those counties. The department dismissed a lawsuit without explanation when Democrat  Robin Carnahan (a defendant in the lawsuit) announced that she was running for the senate.

Clearly, some voting rights issues are more equal than others. And it depends on which party is at a disadvantage.

Hat Tip: Ed Lasky



Politicize the Justice Department? Who? Where?

Acting with the knowledge that the press will never call them out on it as they would have if the Bush administration attempted anything remotely like this, Attorney General Holder's office is turning a blind eye toward voters rights issues.

This piece in the Wall Street Journal by Hans Spakovsky provides the details:

Justice's inexplicable dismissal of a civil lawsuit for voter intimidation against the New Black Panther Party. The Black Panthers weren't content to endorse Barack Obama. They sent their members to the polls last November to "patrol election sites." Fox News aired a video of two Black Panthers in military-style uniforms in a Philadelphia precinct. One of them was carrying a nightstick.

[...]

Justice recently stopped Georgia from implementing a key provision of the Help America Vote Act. Passed in 2002, the act requires states to verify the accuracy of information voters provide on their registration forms by comparing it with state driver's license and Social Security records -- a sensible requirement. With input from Justice Department lawyers in 2008, Georgia implemented this verification process, including checking the citizenship status of applicants. It is a violation of federal and state law for a noncitizen to register and vote in federal and state elections.

Under Georgia's program, anyone flagged as a potential noncitizen would still be registered if he could confirm to local election officials that he was indeed a citizen. Georgia sent letters to over 4,000 potential noncitizens. More than 2,000 failed to confirm their citizenship, strong evidence that noncitizens were prevented from illegally registering and voting.

Then there's the case in Missouri where 13 counties have more people registered to vote than there are voting age adults living in those counties. The department dismissed a lawsuit without explanation when Democrat  Robin Carnahan (a defendant in the lawsuit) announced that she was running for the senate.

Clearly, some voting rights issues are more equal than others. And it depends on which party is at a disadvantage.

Hat Tip: Ed Lasky