Rice: No delay in peace talks

Ed Lasky
Susan Rice in an interview with Dar Al-Hayat  on the possible delaying of peace talks with the Palestinians until Iran is "dealt with:"

Ambassador Rice:  The foreign minister, who obviously plays a very important role in the formulation of Israel's foreign policy, has not said that to President Obama.  And until they have their opportunity to have a discussion, I don't think we should prejudge its context.  That's why I say I say it's a hypothetical.  That said, the President has been very clear - that we don't see any logic in efforts to delay work to achieve a two-state solution.  It is, as he said following his meeting with King Abdullah, it is manifested in Israel's interest as well as the interests of the Palestinian people - and indeed in America's interest - that progress be made as rapidly as possible, in terms of an achievement of a two-state solution.

How about the fact that the Palestinians are internally divided, rent with terror groups who have yet to be defanged; have barely been able to establish security in the West Bank without help from the Israelis; have a barely functioning government in the West Bank and what government exists in the Gaza Strip is a thugocracy; that Israel's own government is new and dependent on agreement among its factions; that links between Iran and Hamas might pose a bit of a problem? How about those reasons for delay, Ms. Rice?

The push against Israel by this administration is gaining ground. Israel is leaving a disputed village that straddles the Lebanese-Israeli border. Jim jones, National Security Adviser and the de facto Secretary of State, tells EU diplomats that America will now be more forceful towards Israel than in the past.

Weren't we assured-by none other than Barack Obama -that his support for Israel would be unwavering.

Seems like the past 100 days has seem more than a bit of wavering.

Were those "just words"?


 

Susan Rice in an interview with Dar Al-Hayat  on the possible delaying of peace talks with the Palestinians until Iran is "dealt with:"

Ambassador Rice:  The foreign minister, who obviously plays a very important role in the formulation of Israel's foreign policy, has not said that to President Obama.  And until they have their opportunity to have a discussion, I don't think we should prejudge its context.  That's why I say I say it's a hypothetical.  That said, the President has been very clear - that we don't see any logic in efforts to delay work to achieve a two-state solution.  It is, as he said following his meeting with King Abdullah, it is manifested in Israel's interest as well as the interests of the Palestinian people - and indeed in America's interest - that progress be made as rapidly as possible, in terms of an achievement of a two-state solution.

How about the fact that the Palestinians are internally divided, rent with terror groups who have yet to be defanged; have barely been able to establish security in the West Bank without help from the Israelis; have a barely functioning government in the West Bank and what government exists in the Gaza Strip is a thugocracy; that Israel's own government is new and dependent on agreement among its factions; that links between Iran and Hamas might pose a bit of a problem? How about those reasons for delay, Ms. Rice?

The push against Israel by this administration is gaining ground. Israel is leaving a disputed village that straddles the Lebanese-Israeli border. Jim jones, National Security Adviser and the de facto Secretary of State, tells EU diplomats that America will now be more forceful towards Israel than in the past.

Weren't we assured-by none other than Barack Obama -that his support for Israel would be unwavering.

Seems like the past 100 days has seem more than a bit of wavering.

Were those "just words"?