Obama to observe National Prayer Day in private

My colleague here at AT, Political Correspondent Rich Baehr, has said in the past that much of Obama's motivation is colored by his desire to be the "un-Bush" president. In other words, anything George Bush did, Obama would do the opposite or not do at all.

I think that explains Obama's decision not to host a breakfast on National Prayer Day and bring together preachers of many faiths to participate. Bush observed the day the last 8 years this way and it appears Obama - like his refusal to attend the Gridiron Dinner - is simply his way of distancing himself from Bush.

But he has drawn the ire of some on the National Prayer Day task force as Julia Duin in the Washington Times reports:

Some evangelicals said they were not surprised by Mr. Obama's decision.

"For those of us who have our doubts about Obama's faith, no, we did not expect him to have the service," said Wendy Wright, president of Concerned Women for America. "But as president, he should put his own lack of faith aside and live up to the office."

Referencing a remark the president made at a recent press conference in Turkey that Americans "do not consider ourselves a Christian nation," she added: "That was projecting his own beliefs, but not reflecting what the majority of Americans feel. It's almost like Obama is trying to remake America into his own image. This is not a rejection of Shirley Dobson; it's a rejection of the concept that America is a spiritual nation and its foundation is Judeo-Christian."

David Brody, White House correspondent for the Christian Broadcasting Network, said in a column that, "within the conservative evangelical community, there was never any real expectation that the White House would hold an event."

Obama is also passing up the 5th annual National Catholic Prayer breakfast tomorrow which is expected to draw more than 1300 participants.

This seems an unnecessary snub by Obama. It only calls into question his stated policy of "reaching out" to the opposition.

I guess there just weren't enough potential votes for him to make the effort.




My colleague here at AT, Political Correspondent Rich Baehr, has said in the past that much of Obama's motivation is colored by his desire to be the "un-Bush" president. In other words, anything George Bush did, Obama would do the opposite or not do at all.

I think that explains Obama's decision not to host a breakfast on National Prayer Day and bring together preachers of many faiths to participate. Bush observed the day the last 8 years this way and it appears Obama - like his refusal to attend the Gridiron Dinner - is simply his way of distancing himself from Bush.

But he has drawn the ire of some on the National Prayer Day task force as Julia Duin in the Washington Times reports:

Some evangelicals said they were not surprised by Mr. Obama's decision.

"For those of us who have our doubts about Obama's faith, no, we did not expect him to have the service," said Wendy Wright, president of Concerned Women for America. "But as president, he should put his own lack of faith aside and live up to the office."

Referencing a remark the president made at a recent press conference in Turkey that Americans "do not consider ourselves a Christian nation," she added: "That was projecting his own beliefs, but not reflecting what the majority of Americans feel. It's almost like Obama is trying to remake America into his own image. This is not a rejection of Shirley Dobson; it's a rejection of the concept that America is a spiritual nation and its foundation is Judeo-Christian."

David Brody, White House correspondent for the Christian Broadcasting Network, said in a column that, "within the conservative evangelical community, there was never any real expectation that the White House would hold an event."

Obama is also passing up the 5th annual National Catholic Prayer breakfast tomorrow which is expected to draw more than 1300 participants.

This seems an unnecessary snub by Obama. It only calls into question his stated policy of "reaching out" to the opposition.

I guess there just weren't enough potential votes for him to make the effort.