Double standards in Canada on presidential assassination fantasy

The CBC has been rebuked for broadcasting a joke about the assassination of President Obama. I agree that it is beyond the pale to do anything that could be construed as inciting assassination. But I am curious as to the seeming lack of Canadian commentary rebuking the Toronto Film Festival for screening an entire film about the prospective assassination of George W. Bush.

Almost three years ago, I wrote about the film as political pornography, and rebuked the Toronto Film Festival for screening such material. My criticism was so unusual that the CTV network (the privately owned competitor of CBC TV) invited me to appear on one of its prime time news shows to discuss it. The anchor, to my surprise, kept bringing up the false notion that I was in favor of censorship. I told her repeatedly that I believe the TFF ought to be ashamed and condemned by all Canadians and all decent people the world over for screening such a film, but that I would not ask the government to suppress the film. Somehow, this message failed to penetrate. I was cast as the censorious prude.

So I am puzzled now that with a different US president, Canada seems up in arms, whereas it was virtually silent when a much more egregious fantasy was honored in Canada by those who fancy themselves cultural arbiters. If I missed the public censure of the TFF, I will be happy to learn of it.
The CBC has been rebuked for broadcasting a joke about the assassination of President Obama. I agree that it is beyond the pale to do anything that could be construed as inciting assassination. But I am curious as to the seeming lack of Canadian commentary rebuking the Toronto Film Festival for screening an entire film about the prospective assassination of George W. Bush.

Almost three years ago, I wrote about the film as political pornography, and rebuked the Toronto Film Festival for screening such material. My criticism was so unusual that the CTV network (the privately owned competitor of CBC TV) invited me to appear on one of its prime time news shows to discuss it. The anchor, to my surprise, kept bringing up the false notion that I was in favor of censorship. I told her repeatedly that I believe the TFF ought to be ashamed and condemned by all Canadians and all decent people the world over for screening such a film, but that I would not ask the government to suppress the film. Somehow, this message failed to penetrate. I was cast as the censorious prude.

So I am puzzled now that with a different US president, Canada seems up in arms, whereas it was virtually silent when a much more egregious fantasy was honored in Canada by those who fancy themselves cultural arbiters. If I missed the public censure of the TFF, I will be happy to learn of it.