Why does Obama apologzie so much?

Rick Moran
Peter Wehrner of Commentary Magazine believes he knows the reason:

President Obama also took issue with those who believe that "if we showed courtesy or opened up dialogue with governments that had previously been hostile to us, that that somehow would be a sign of weakness." According to Obama, "It's unlikely that as a consequence of me shaking hands or having a polite conversation with Mr. Chavez that we are endangering the strategic interests of the United States."

But what matters is the stratagem behind the "polite conversations." President Obama appears to be making a bet that his personal charm and reticence in defending America against those who are disparaging her will redound to our benefit, that his approach will win the confidence of leaders long antagonistic to America and its values, and that in the end his apology tour will lead to greater cooperation in advancing justice and American ideals.

Those of us who differ with Obama's approach operate on a different set of assumptions and expectations.

That last by Mr. Wehner is an understatement.

Obama neither supports our friends nor does he defend the US against attacks - one of the jobs of a president. Instead, he hopes that by agreeing with even the most outrageously exaggerated claims of American malfeasance, that he will somehow change our enemy's minds and make them act like normal members of the world community.

This kind of nauseating naivete also undercuts people who are fighting for freedoms in places like Venezuela and Cuba - people who put their lives on the line and instead of support from Obama, they get the back of his hand.

The only ray of hope is that eventually, Obama will run out of nations to which he will feel compelled to apologize. Long before then, those enemies that he is so eager to engage will no doubt take the mettle of the man and treat him with the contempt he deserves.



Peter Wehrner of Commentary Magazine believes he knows the reason:

President Obama also took issue with those who believe that "if we showed courtesy or opened up dialogue with governments that had previously been hostile to us, that that somehow would be a sign of weakness." According to Obama, "It's unlikely that as a consequence of me shaking hands or having a polite conversation with Mr. Chavez that we are endangering the strategic interests of the United States."

But what matters is the stratagem behind the "polite conversations." President Obama appears to be making a bet that his personal charm and reticence in defending America against those who are disparaging her will redound to our benefit, that his approach will win the confidence of leaders long antagonistic to America and its values, and that in the end his apology tour will lead to greater cooperation in advancing justice and American ideals.

Those of us who differ with Obama's approach operate on a different set of assumptions and expectations.

That last by Mr. Wehner is an understatement.

Obama neither supports our friends nor does he defend the US against attacks - one of the jobs of a president. Instead, he hopes that by agreeing with even the most outrageously exaggerated claims of American malfeasance, that he will somehow change our enemy's minds and make them act like normal members of the world community.

This kind of nauseating naivete also undercuts people who are fighting for freedoms in places like Venezuela and Cuba - people who put their lives on the line and instead of support from Obama, they get the back of his hand.

The only ray of hope is that eventually, Obama will run out of nations to which he will feel compelled to apologize. Long before then, those enemies that he is so eager to engage will no doubt take the mettle of the man and treat him with the contempt he deserves.