What's in a name?

Reuters is reporting that American hog farmers and producers are upset at the name given to the latest flu bug.

They believe that naming the disease "Swine Flu" is hurting their business:

What's in a name? U.S. pork producers are finding that the name of the virus spreading from Mexico is affecting their business, prompting U.S. officials to argue for changing the name from swine flu.

At a news briefing, Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano and Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack took pains to repeatedly refer to the flu as the "H1N1 virus."

"This is not a food-borne illness, virus. It is not correct to refer to it as swine flu because really that's not what this is about," Vilsack said.

Israel has already rejected the name swine flu, and opted to call it "Mexico flu." Jewish dietary laws forbid eating pork.

The Paris-based World Organization for Animal Health also objected to the name, saying the virus contains avian and human components and no pig so far has been found ill with the disease. And there is growing sentiment in the farm sector to call it the North American virus -- although disease expert Anthony Fauci told a Senate hearing the "swine flu" designation reflected scientific naming protocol.

Perhaps the same thing should be tried with other diseases. I'm surprised there has been no outcry against "German" measels. Perhaps Cranes would not like the idea of "Whooping" cough.

Once we start down this road, there's no end to it. Bird lovers rejecting "Avian" Flu, short people complaining about "Small" pox - you get the picture.

Vilsack can call it anything he wishes but you can dress up the Flu in a prom dress and in the end, your still left with Swine Flu.

Better get used to it.




Reuters is reporting that American hog farmers and producers are upset at the name given to the latest flu bug.

They believe that naming the disease "Swine Flu" is hurting their business:

What's in a name? U.S. pork producers are finding that the name of the virus spreading from Mexico is affecting their business, prompting U.S. officials to argue for changing the name from swine flu.

At a news briefing, Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano and Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack took pains to repeatedly refer to the flu as the "H1N1 virus."

"This is not a food-borne illness, virus. It is not correct to refer to it as swine flu because really that's not what this is about," Vilsack said.

Israel has already rejected the name swine flu, and opted to call it "Mexico flu." Jewish dietary laws forbid eating pork.

The Paris-based World Organization for Animal Health also objected to the name, saying the virus contains avian and human components and no pig so far has been found ill with the disease. And there is growing sentiment in the farm sector to call it the North American virus -- although disease expert Anthony Fauci told a Senate hearing the "swine flu" designation reflected scientific naming protocol.

Perhaps the same thing should be tried with other diseases. I'm surprised there has been no outcry against "German" measels. Perhaps Cranes would not like the idea of "Whooping" cough.

Once we start down this road, there's no end to it. Bird lovers rejecting "Avian" Flu, short people complaining about "Small" pox - you get the picture.

Vilsack can call it anything he wishes but you can dress up the Flu in a prom dress and in the end, your still left with Swine Flu.

Better get used to it.