UK cabinet minister recommends pandering to Islamists

The UK social cohesion minister (yes! - there is actually a such a position) Sadiq Khan has gone on the record suggesting that Britain adopt an anti-US foreign policy so as to appease radical Pakistani youth (in Pakistan!), a major source of UK immigrants. The Guardian/Observer reports:

The UK must distance itself from American foreign policy if Pakistani youths are to be prevented from growing up hating Britain, according to the government's social cohesion minister.

The comments by Sadiq Khan, who has just returned from a fact-finding trip to Pakistan, follow the arrests of 12 men - 10 of whom were Pakistani nationals - in the north-west of England last week on suspicion of planning a terror attack. They are likely to be given short shrift from Number 10, which has been keen to ally itself to the Obama administration. Earlier this month Gordon Brown stressed the two allies were united in their fight against terrorism in Pakistan.

But Khan, London's first Muslim MP, said the UK must differentiate itself from the US after attending meetings at universities in Pakistan. "I listened to the anger and pain over the challenges that young people growing up in Pakistan face, including the anger and frustration over US drone attacks," he said.

Pandering to the opinions of one segment of a foreign population is a startling basis for conducting a nation's foreign policy.

Hat tip: Prairie Pundit, Larwyn
The UK social cohesion minister (yes! - there is actually a such a position) Sadiq Khan has gone on the record suggesting that Britain adopt an anti-US foreign policy so as to appease radical Pakistani youth (in Pakistan!), a major source of UK immigrants. The Guardian/Observer reports:

The UK must distance itself from American foreign policy if Pakistani youths are to be prevented from growing up hating Britain, according to the government's social cohesion minister.

The comments by Sadiq Khan, who has just returned from a fact-finding trip to Pakistan, follow the arrests of 12 men - 10 of whom were Pakistani nationals - in the north-west of England last week on suspicion of planning a terror attack. They are likely to be given short shrift from Number 10, which has been keen to ally itself to the Obama administration. Earlier this month Gordon Brown stressed the two allies were united in their fight against terrorism in Pakistan.

But Khan, London's first Muslim MP, said the UK must differentiate itself from the US after attending meetings at universities in Pakistan. "I listened to the anger and pain over the challenges that young people growing up in Pakistan face, including the anger and frustration over US drone attacks," he said.

Pandering to the opinions of one segment of a foreign population is a startling basis for conducting a nation's foreign policy.

Hat tip: Prairie Pundit, Larwyn