'Our team needs more political theater and fewer marketing consultants'

Rick Moran
Good advice from Mark Kirkorian at The Corner who was remarking on this funny bit being promoted at the Greenville, SC tea party:

A reader wrote me saying that at the Greenville, S.C., Tea Party, "They will be selling the 'Obama burger' - you pay for one and they cut it in half and give the rest to the guy behind you for free!!"
Who said conservatives can't be funny and imaginative?

Kirkorian, who attended the DC tea party, believes there's a chance that the tea party movement could lead to the formation of a new political party:

Glenn Reynolds may be reaching a bit when he writes "The mainstream Republican Party still seems limp and disorganized. This grassroots effort may revitalize it. Or the tea-party movement may lead to a new third party that may replace the GOP, just as the GOP replaced the fractured and hapless Whigs." But here's hoping.
Kirkorian may be getting a little too far ahead of himself but remember, the Republican party was born in Ripon, WI by a small group of activists who didn't believe the Whig party spoke for them anymore on issues from the expansion of slavery to economic matters. And there are some political professionals who actually believe the times have never been riper for the formation of a third party.

But the centrifugal forces put out by both parties makes it more likely that the tea party will be absorbed into the GOP at some point, losing some members as a result but hopefully, changing the way Republicans do business.



Good advice from Mark Kirkorian at The Corner who was remarking on this funny bit being promoted at the Greenville, SC tea party:

A reader wrote me saying that at the Greenville, S.C., Tea Party, "They will be selling the 'Obama burger' - you pay for one and they cut it in half and give the rest to the guy behind you for free!!"
Who said conservatives can't be funny and imaginative?

Kirkorian, who attended the DC tea party, believes there's a chance that the tea party movement could lead to the formation of a new political party:

Glenn Reynolds may be reaching a bit when he writes "The mainstream Republican Party still seems limp and disorganized. This grassroots effort may revitalize it. Or the tea-party movement may lead to a new third party that may replace the GOP, just as the GOP replaced the fractured and hapless Whigs." But here's hoping.
Kirkorian may be getting a little too far ahead of himself but remember, the Republican party was born in Ripon, WI by a small group of activists who didn't believe the Whig party spoke for them anymore on issues from the expansion of slavery to economic matters. And there are some political professionals who actually believe the times have never been riper for the formation of a third party.

But the centrifugal forces put out by both parties makes it more likely that the tea party will be absorbed into the GOP at some point, losing some members as a result but hopefully, changing the way Republicans do business.