NASA: It's Not Just the CO2

Eileen McDevitt and Larrey Anderson
Two years ago American Thinker reported NASA’s Drew Shindell saying this:

"The melting of Greenland has been accelerating so incredibly rapidly that the I.P.C.C. report will already be out of date in predicting sea level rise, which will probably be much worse than is predicted in the I.P.C.C. report."

That same scientist is now blaming global warming not on CO2 but on … hold on to your deodorant … aerosols.

NASA recently released a summary of a new scientific report.  Here are some excerpts from that summary:

Though greenhouse gases are invariably at the center of discussions about global climate change, new NASA research suggests that much of the atmospheric warming observed in the Arctic since 1976 may be due to changes in tiny airborne particles called aerosols.

Emitted by natural and human sources, aerosols can directly influence climate by reflecting or absorbing the sun's radiation. The small particles also affect climate indirectly by seeding clouds and changing cloud properties, such as reflectivity.

A new study, led by climate scientist Drew Shindell of the NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies, New York, used a coupled ocean-atmosphere model to investigate how sensitive different regional climates are to changes in levels of carbon dioxide, ozone, and aerosols.

The researchers found that the mid and high latitudes are especially responsive to changes in the level of aerosols. Indeed, the model suggests aerosols likely account for 45 percent or more of the warming that has occurred in the Arctic during the last three decades. The results were published in the April issue of Nature Geoscience.

The regions of Earth that showed the strongest responses to aerosols in the model are the same regions that have witnessed the greatest real-world temperature increases since 1976. The Arctic region has seen its surface air temperatures increase by 1.5 C (2.7 F) since the mid-1970s. In the Antarctic, where aerosols play less of a role, the surface air temperature has increased about 0.35 C (0.6 F).

As the scientific evidence linking man made global warming to CO2 grows weaker and weaker, the global warming charlatans are starting to look around for a new culprit.

Keep your eyes peeled for the term “aerosol ” to start appearing in AGW literature soon.  And watch for those cap and trade proposals regulating your personal deodorants and hair spray.

Hat tip: John McMahon

Two years ago American Thinker reported NASA’s Drew Shindell saying this:

"The melting of Greenland has been accelerating so incredibly rapidly that the I.P.C.C. report will already be out of date in predicting sea level rise, which will probably be much worse than is predicted in the I.P.C.C. report."

That same scientist is now blaming global warming not on CO2 but on … hold on to your deodorant … aerosols.

NASA recently released a summary of a new scientific report.  Here are some excerpts from that summary:

Though greenhouse gases are invariably at the center of discussions about global climate change, new NASA research suggests that much of the atmospheric warming observed in the Arctic since 1976 may be due to changes in tiny airborne particles called aerosols.

Emitted by natural and human sources, aerosols can directly influence climate by reflecting or absorbing the sun's radiation. The small particles also affect climate indirectly by seeding clouds and changing cloud properties, such as reflectivity.

A new study, led by climate scientist Drew Shindell of the NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies, New York, used a coupled ocean-atmosphere model to investigate how sensitive different regional climates are to changes in levels of carbon dioxide, ozone, and aerosols.

The researchers found that the mid and high latitudes are especially responsive to changes in the level of aerosols. Indeed, the model suggests aerosols likely account for 45 percent or more of the warming that has occurred in the Arctic during the last three decades. The results were published in the April issue of Nature Geoscience.

The regions of Earth that showed the strongest responses to aerosols in the model are the same regions that have witnessed the greatest real-world temperature increases since 1976. The Arctic region has seen its surface air temperatures increase by 1.5 C (2.7 F) since the mid-1970s. In the Antarctic, where aerosols play less of a role, the surface air temperature has increased about 0.35 C (0.6 F).

As the scientific evidence linking man made global warming to CO2 grows weaker and weaker, the global warming charlatans are starting to look around for a new culprit.

Keep your eyes peeled for the term “aerosol ” to start appearing in AGW literature soon.  And watch for those cap and trade proposals regulating your personal deodorants and hair spray.

Hat tip: John McMahon