Is Obama's message machine on the fritz?

Alex Conant is making the point and it hinges on three monumental goofs that came out of the Obama communications apparatus this week.

First was the hilarious solemnity with which the White House announced that the president had ordered his cabinet to find $100 million in savings from the budget.

Second,is the way the entire torture memo affair was handled. The message was garbled and there was obvious miscommunication with Emanuel when he said that there was no possibility of any prosecution of the lawyers while Obama left the door open to such trials. There was also the fact that administration officials were running around claiming no good info came from the use of enhanced interrogation techniques when Obama's own Director of National Intelligence said otherwise.

Finally, there was the curious resignation of a high level staffer:

These two message-missteps came as news broke last night that White House Communications Director Ellen Moran was resigning to take what POLITICO described as a "decidedly less powerful position" at the Commerce Department. The New York Times quoted unnamed Democrats saying that she resigned because "she had not been a good fit inside the White House," which sounds like a nice way of saying that she didn't fit well with David Axelrod. (In fact, Chris Cillizza's post on Axelrod's inner circle earlier this week originally included Moran's deputy, but not Moran herself.)

Any one of these gaffs or events would call into question the competence of Obama's message machine. To have three in one week shows a White House that is confused and poorly run.

About what you'd expect from someone who took office with no executive experience.

Hat Tip: Ed Lasky


Alex Conant is making the point and it hinges on three monumental goofs that came out of the Obama communications apparatus this week.

First was the hilarious solemnity with which the White House announced that the president had ordered his cabinet to find $100 million in savings from the budget.

Second,is the way the entire torture memo affair was handled. The message was garbled and there was obvious miscommunication with Emanuel when he said that there was no possibility of any prosecution of the lawyers while Obama left the door open to such trials. There was also the fact that administration officials were running around claiming no good info came from the use of enhanced interrogation techniques when Obama's own Director of National Intelligence said otherwise.

Finally, there was the curious resignation of a high level staffer:

These two message-missteps came as news broke last night that White House Communications Director Ellen Moran was resigning to take what POLITICO described as a "decidedly less powerful position" at the Commerce Department. The New York Times quoted unnamed Democrats saying that she resigned because "she had not been a good fit inside the White House," which sounds like a nice way of saying that she didn't fit well with David Axelrod. (In fact, Chris Cillizza's post on Axelrod's inner circle earlier this week originally included Moran's deputy, but not Moran herself.)

Any one of these gaffs or events would call into question the competence of Obama's message machine. To have three in one week shows a White House that is confused and poorly run.

About what you'd expect from someone who took office with no executive experience.

Hat Tip: Ed Lasky