How to End Piracy in One Easy Lesson

John Keegan writing in the UK Telegraph has explained in simple English (hopefully using a delightful British accent) how to put an end to Somalian piracy.

Here is his solution:
The Gulf of Aden is the southern exit of the Suez Canal, and the ships on which the pirates are preying are not small sailing vessels, but huge container ships, carrying the cargoes upon which the world's prosperity depends.

The rich nations are already taking steps to protect their shipping – the US 5th Fleet has five to 10 ships in the area; there is also an EU force, and a Nato fleet. A host of countries, including Britain, China, Russia, India, Saudi Arabia, Denmark and Malaysia, have either sent warships or are reportedly considering doing so.

Such ships must act promptly and ruthlessly, as piracy will spread unless it is stamped out. The Gulf of Aden is an exit from the Mediterranean, one of the world's most important seas, crossed annually by thousands of ships. So our campaign must be ruthless and pitiless: pirate ships must be sunk on sight and the crews left to swim to safety, if it can be reached.

Many would complain about such tactics but, in my opinion, pirates have no rights -- indeed, it will be vital to exclude human rights lawyers from the anti-piracy campaign. To bring any captives to Europe or America for trial would probably be to grant them their dearest wish, which is to secure entry to a new life in the First World.

It is vital to begin re-equipping [the West’s navies] sooner, rather than later. [T]he pirates will not go away. Nor can they be negotiated out of the system. They needed to be hunted to extinction -- and the time to start the hunt is now.
Blimey, those Brits have a way with words.

John Keegan writing in the UK Telegraph has explained in simple English (hopefully using a delightful British accent) how to put an end to Somalian piracy.

Here is his solution:
The Gulf of Aden is the southern exit of the Suez Canal, and the ships on which the pirates are preying are not small sailing vessels, but huge container ships, carrying the cargoes upon which the world's prosperity depends.

The rich nations are already taking steps to protect their shipping – the US 5th Fleet has five to 10 ships in the area; there is also an EU force, and a Nato fleet. A host of countries, including Britain, China, Russia, India, Saudi Arabia, Denmark and Malaysia, have either sent warships or are reportedly considering doing so.

Such ships must act promptly and ruthlessly, as piracy will spread unless it is stamped out. The Gulf of Aden is an exit from the Mediterranean, one of the world's most important seas, crossed annually by thousands of ships. So our campaign must be ruthless and pitiless: pirate ships must be sunk on sight and the crews left to swim to safety, if it can be reached.

Many would complain about such tactics but, in my opinion, pirates have no rights -- indeed, it will be vital to exclude human rights lawyers from the anti-piracy campaign. To bring any captives to Europe or America for trial would probably be to grant them their dearest wish, which is to secure entry to a new life in the First World.

It is vital to begin re-equipping [the West’s navies] sooner, rather than later. [T]he pirates will not go away. Nor can they be negotiated out of the system. They needed to be hunted to extinction -- and the time to start the hunt is now.
Blimey, those Brits have a way with words.