Terrorists on Welfare?

Here’s how this works. Last Wednesday Attorney General Eric Holder announced that some Islamic terrorists now being held at Gitmo might have to be released.

Trial balloon. We all know the drill.

Reuters reported it this way on Wednesday:

The administration faces intense political resistance to the idea of bringing the prisoners to the United States as part of closing the detention camp. The administration seeks to transfer some detainees to Europe or other countries while freeing others.

Holder told reporters at the Justice Department that the administration's review, made on a case-by-case basis, would determine whether the prisoners need to be put on trial or whether they can be released.

"For those who are in that second category, who can be released, there are a variety of options that we have. Among them is the possibility that we could release them into this country," he said.

Holder gives us a vague little reference.  Maybe some terrorists can be released (not held in some other prison -- released) and maybe into this country.

Skip two days. The Director of National Intelligence, Dennis Blair, tell us a bit more about the plan for the Gitmo terrorists -- but he does so as a throw away line in his first news conference on Mexico.

Blair confirmed Holder’s hint that some Gitmo's terrorists will be freed (not held prisoner) in the United States. Then he added this little gem: “We can’t put them on the street.”

What he meant was … get ready for it … the terrorists released into the US may receive some form of welfare assistance. You and I might get to pay for the privilege of their presence in our country.

Elections have consequences. Even if the main stream media doesn’t tell you that.

Hat tip: Otis Glazebrook (IV!)

Here’s how this works. Last Wednesday Attorney General Eric Holder announced that some Islamic terrorists now being held at Gitmo might have to be released.

Trial balloon. We all know the drill.

Reuters reported it this way on Wednesday:

The administration faces intense political resistance to the idea of bringing the prisoners to the United States as part of closing the detention camp. The administration seeks to transfer some detainees to Europe or other countries while freeing others.

Holder told reporters at the Justice Department that the administration's review, made on a case-by-case basis, would determine whether the prisoners need to be put on trial or whether they can be released.

"For those who are in that second category, who can be released, there are a variety of options that we have. Among them is the possibility that we could release them into this country," he said.

Holder gives us a vague little reference.  Maybe some terrorists can be released (not held in some other prison -- released) and maybe into this country.

Skip two days. The Director of National Intelligence, Dennis Blair, tell us a bit more about the plan for the Gitmo terrorists -- but he does so as a throw away line in his first news conference on Mexico.

Blair confirmed Holder’s hint that some Gitmo's terrorists will be freed (not held prisoner) in the United States. Then he added this little gem: “We can’t put them on the street.”

What he meant was … get ready for it … the terrorists released into the US may receive some form of welfare assistance. You and I might get to pay for the privilege of their presence in our country.

Elections have consequences. Even if the main stream media doesn’t tell you that.

Hat tip: Otis Glazebrook (IV!)