Let other states produce California's power

As the Democrats make extraction, refining  and utilization of traditional fossil fuels increasingly impossible, touting alternative sources, the party's leaders put their own aesthetic NIMBYism first.

Ted Kennedy has worked to block windmills that might hamper his ocean view.
Now Diane Feinstein wants to block solar panels in the California desert.
WASHINGTON -- California's Mojave Desert may seem ideally suited for solar energy production, but concern over what several proposed projects might do to the aesthetics of the region and its tortoise population is setting up a potential clash between conservationists and companies seeking to develop renewable energy.
Nineteen companies have submitted applications to build solar or wind facilities on a parcel of 500,000 desert acres, but Sen. Dianne Feinstein said Friday such development would violate the spirit of what conservationists had intended when they donated much of the land to the public.
Feinstein said Friday she intends to push legislation that would turn the land into a national monument, which would allow for existing uses to continue while preventing future development.
Maybe suckers in places where people bitterly cling to their guns will agree to  be overrun with windmills and solar panels to provide energy to  those who demand  fossil-free energy in California and Massachusetts.
As the Democrats make extraction, refining  and utilization of traditional fossil fuels increasingly impossible, touting alternative sources, the party's leaders put their own aesthetic NIMBYism first.

Ted Kennedy has worked to block windmills that might hamper his ocean view.
Now Diane Feinstein wants to block solar panels in the California desert.
WASHINGTON -- California's Mojave Desert may seem ideally suited for solar energy production, but concern over what several proposed projects might do to the aesthetics of the region and its tortoise population is setting up a potential clash between conservationists and companies seeking to develop renewable energy.
Nineteen companies have submitted applications to build solar or wind facilities on a parcel of 500,000 desert acres, but Sen. Dianne Feinstein said Friday such development would violate the spirit of what conservationists had intended when they donated much of the land to the public.
Feinstein said Friday she intends to push legislation that would turn the land into a national monument, which would allow for existing uses to continue while preventing future development.
Maybe suckers in places where people bitterly cling to their guns will agree to  be overrun with windmills and solar panels to provide energy to  those who demand  fossil-free energy in California and Massachusetts.