Growth stocks

Clarice Feldman and Rosslyn Smith
This story from ESPN confirms that one industry has been booming.  According to the National Shooting Sports Foundation (NSSF) the monthly sales for firearms have remained above normal since November's election and many vendors are reporting that the cannot keep popular caliber ammunition in stock. 
"From what we've heard, ammunition manufacturers are operating at full capacity in an attempt to keep up with demand," says Novin. "Gun owners are worried about taxes being added to ammo, or worried about new laws that will affect the production, and consequently the price, of ammunition. It's understandable; there are a lot of people in power now who have a long history of supporting bills that violate Second Amendment rights."

Valerie Peters, a spokesperson for Winchester Ammunition in East Alton, Ill., says her company's plant is running "24/7" in an attempt to keep up with demand.

Anecdotal evidence suggests that there may be more to this trend than existing gun owners stocking up in anticipation of restrictions from the Obama administration.  Local hunters have told me some of our part year residents from the big city are asking questions about what type of guns they might consider for personal protection.   For readers with similar concerns, I recommend this site  as a good starting place.

My recent experience in the garden department at the local Wal-mart suggests that seed companies are also having a good year.  As I picked up seed starting supplies two weeks ago, I was bombarded with questions from people who had never before tried to grow their own vegetables.
This story from ESPN confirms that one industry has been booming.  According to the National Shooting Sports Foundation (NSSF) the monthly sales for firearms have remained above normal since November's election and many vendors are reporting that the cannot keep popular caliber ammunition in stock. 
"From what we've heard, ammunition manufacturers are operating at full capacity in an attempt to keep up with demand," says Novin. "Gun owners are worried about taxes being added to ammo, or worried about new laws that will affect the production, and consequently the price, of ammunition. It's understandable; there are a lot of people in power now who have a long history of supporting bills that violate Second Amendment rights."

Valerie Peters, a spokesperson for Winchester Ammunition in East Alton, Ill., says her company's plant is running "24/7" in an attempt to keep up with demand.

Anecdotal evidence suggests that there may be more to this trend than existing gun owners stocking up in anticipation of restrictions from the Obama administration.  Local hunters have told me some of our part year residents from the big city are asking questions about what type of guns they might consider for personal protection.   For readers with similar concerns, I recommend this site  as a good starting place.

My recent experience in the garden department at the local Wal-mart suggests that seed companies are also having a good year.  As I picked up seed starting supplies two weeks ago, I was bombarded with questions from people who had never before tried to grow their own vegetables.