Doublespeak from Newt Gingrich

Former Speaker of the House Newt Gingrich displayed classic doublespeak as he expressed two contradictory beliefs at the same time.
 
During the airing of NBC’s Meet the Press on March 8, Gingrich had this exchange with the host:
 
MR. GREGORY:  Do you think Republicans are discordant on that point about whether they want him to fail or succeed?
 
REP. GINGRICH:  I don't think anyone should want the president of the United States to fail.  I want some of his policies to be stopped, but I don't want the president of the United States to fail.
 
MR. GREGORY:  Right.
 
Gingrich joins Republican National Committee Chairman Michael Steele (who later carefully clarified his similar comments that were overtly critical of talk show host Rush Limbaugh) in his attempt to play nice -- be diplomatic -- statesmanlike -- and put distance between himself and the zeal of the conservative talk show host.
 
Gingrich’s comment on Meet the Press is of the same species of those who said (not since the election though, strangely enough) that they supported the troops in Iraq, but not their mission.  Anyway you cut it that translates into supporting their failure.
 
It’s akin to saying, “Sure, I hope he succeeds as a chef, but I want some of his restaurant’s patrons to throw their plates back at the kitchen.” Or, “I want some of his books to sell copies in the single digits, but hope he succeeds as an author.”
 
Gingrich says, “I don't think anyone should want the president of the United States to fail.”  In the context of the discussion during Meet the Press, the article “the” clearly meant “this” president, and not just any president in general.  
 
And there are millions of us, apparently not including Gingrich, who understand what this President is about, and we most decidedly want him to comprehensively fail at what he sees as his mission and future for America.
Former Speaker of the House Newt Gingrich displayed classic doublespeak as he expressed two contradictory beliefs at the same time.
 
During the airing of NBC’s Meet the Press on March 8, Gingrich had this exchange with the host:
 
MR. GREGORY:  Do you think Republicans are discordant on that point about whether they want him to fail or succeed?
 
REP. GINGRICH:  I don't think anyone should want the president of the United States to fail.  I want some of his policies to be stopped, but I don't want the president of the United States to fail.
 
MR. GREGORY:  Right.
 
Gingrich joins Republican National Committee Chairman Michael Steele (who later carefully clarified his similar comments that were overtly critical of talk show host Rush Limbaugh) in his attempt to play nice -- be diplomatic -- statesmanlike -- and put distance between himself and the zeal of the conservative talk show host.
 
Gingrich’s comment on Meet the Press is of the same species of those who said (not since the election though, strangely enough) that they supported the troops in Iraq, but not their mission.  Anyway you cut it that translates into supporting their failure.
 
It’s akin to saying, “Sure, I hope he succeeds as a chef, but I want some of his restaurant’s patrons to throw their plates back at the kitchen.” Or, “I want some of his books to sell copies in the single digits, but hope he succeeds as an author.”
 
Gingrich says, “I don't think anyone should want the president of the United States to fail.”  In the context of the discussion during Meet the Press, the article “the” clearly meant “this” president, and not just any president in general.  
 
And there are millions of us, apparently not including Gingrich, who understand what this President is about, and we most decidedly want him to comprehensively fail at what he sees as his mission and future for America.