UK schools teaching students to see things through terrorists' eyes

Thomas Lifson
A frightening degree of liberal insanity flourishes in the United Kingdom, where schools are actually adopting a curriculum to teach pupils to understand, and perhaps even sympathize with the terrorists who attack innocent civilians there (and elsewhere).

The Guardian reported:

Pupils are being asked to put themselves inside the minds of the 7/7 bombers to understand the motives of terrorists.

A government-endorsed teaching pack suggests secondary schools ask pupils to do a presentation on the 7 July London terror attacks from the bombers' perspective.

The attacks, in 2005, killed 52 of the capital's commuters and injured 700 others.

The pack, called Things Do Change, was developed in West Yorkshire, home to three of the 7/7 bombers: Siddique Khan, Shezad Tanweer and Hasib Hussain.

Its author, Sail Suleman, told the Times Educational Supplement that schools should not shy away from asking pupils to think about what turns people into extremists.

She said: "Radicals, extremists and fundamentalists come in all different forms. Is it right? Is it wrong? Is it justified? Was it pressure from individuals they were hanging out with? Hopefully, we'll encourage pupils to stay away from those individuals."

The department for children, schools and families (DCSF) recommends the pack to teachers as part of its online guidance on how schools can help tackle extremism.

It can be a useful exercise for mature adults to understand the ideologies of enemies. During World War II, for example, there was intense study of the ideology of Nazism and Imperial Japan. Ruth Benedict's classic study of Japanese culture, The Chrysanthemum and the Sword, was one result of this form of inquiry.

But in the hands of schoolteachers (a very leftwing group as a whole), exposing young minds to the grievances, real and imagined, of Islamist murderers, is a very, very bad idea.

Hat tip: Islam in Action
A frightening degree of liberal insanity flourishes in the United Kingdom, where schools are actually adopting a curriculum to teach pupils to understand, and perhaps even sympathize with the terrorists who attack innocent civilians there (and elsewhere).

The Guardian reported:

Pupils are being asked to put themselves inside the minds of the 7/7 bombers to understand the motives of terrorists.

A government-endorsed teaching pack suggests secondary schools ask pupils to do a presentation on the 7 July London terror attacks from the bombers' perspective.

The attacks, in 2005, killed 52 of the capital's commuters and injured 700 others.

The pack, called Things Do Change, was developed in West Yorkshire, home to three of the 7/7 bombers: Siddique Khan, Shezad Tanweer and Hasib Hussain.

Its author, Sail Suleman, told the Times Educational Supplement that schools should not shy away from asking pupils to think about what turns people into extremists.

She said: "Radicals, extremists and fundamentalists come in all different forms. Is it right? Is it wrong? Is it justified? Was it pressure from individuals they were hanging out with? Hopefully, we'll encourage pupils to stay away from those individuals."

The department for children, schools and families (DCSF) recommends the pack to teachers as part of its online guidance on how schools can help tackle extremism.

It can be a useful exercise for mature adults to understand the ideologies of enemies. During World War II, for example, there was intense study of the ideology of Nazism and Imperial Japan. Ruth Benedict's classic study of Japanese culture, The Chrysanthemum and the Sword, was one result of this form of inquiry.

But in the hands of schoolteachers (a very leftwing group as a whole), exposing young minds to the grievances, real and imagined, of Islamist murderers, is a very, very bad idea.

Hat tip: Islam in Action