The Axis Pushing the US into Durban II (updated)

According to the Haaretz newspaper, human rights groups urged the Obama administration to engage in the Durban II conference on racism. One group is highlighted as issuing a statement welcoming US participation in the conference:

Human Rights First, the leading human rights organization in the U.S., on Tuesday issued a statement welcoming Obama's intention of participating in the summit.

"We urge the administration to work to ensure that the conference advances rather than undermines the protection of fundamental rights, and to engage with others to press for that outcome," the statement reads.

"This session provides an opportunity for the United States to lead efforts to address problems with language proposed for the current draft of the outcome document," said the statement. "The United States should also encourage states to review the implementation of their international commitments to combat racism. Although this is the stated purpose of the conference, states have put in very little effort so far to engage in any meaningful review."


Human Rights First is funded, in part, by the Open Society Institute (George Soros) and the Ford Foundation.
With an $8.3 million budget in 2005, HRF is funded by the Open Society Institute, the MacArthur Foundation, New York University, the Ford Foundation, American Express Company, Citigroup, and the District of Columbia Bar Foundation. 

Update:  

Pastor Jeremiah Wright supported Durban I and objected to America's boycott.

Benny Avni writes in the New York Post:

The US delegation walked out of the 2001 notorious hatefest posing as an anti-racism conference in Durban, South Africa. That walkout, directed by Secretary of State Colin Powell, would have made a much bigger splash if 9/11 hadn't happened shortly afterward.

Powell's move was applauded by most Americans, with a few exceptions, like the Rev. Jeremiah Wright, who said in a sermon a year later that Washington had left Durban because "somebody dared to point out the racism" prevalent "both here and in Israel."

And the "review" conference in April is on track to be just as odious - with direct assaults on free speech, the right to defend against terrorism and of course on the world's eternal boogeyman, Israel.

Wright must be happy, now that his long time congregant and major donor is in office and following his preferences on Israel.

According to the Haaretz newspaper, human rights groups urged the Obama administration to engage in the Durban II conference on racism. One group is highlighted as issuing a statement welcoming US participation in the conference:

Human Rights First, the leading human rights organization in the U.S., on Tuesday issued a statement welcoming Obama's intention of participating in the summit.

"We urge the administration to work to ensure that the conference advances rather than undermines the protection of fundamental rights, and to engage with others to press for that outcome," the statement reads.

"This session provides an opportunity for the United States to lead efforts to address problems with language proposed for the current draft of the outcome document," said the statement. "The United States should also encourage states to review the implementation of their international commitments to combat racism. Although this is the stated purpose of the conference, states have put in very little effort so far to engage in any meaningful review."


Human Rights First is funded, in part, by the Open Society Institute (George Soros) and the Ford Foundation.
With an $8.3 million budget in 2005, HRF is funded by the Open Society Institute, the MacArthur Foundation, New York University, the Ford Foundation, American Express Company, Citigroup, and the District of Columbia Bar Foundation. 

Update:  

Pastor Jeremiah Wright supported Durban I and objected to America's boycott.

Benny Avni writes in the New York Post:

The US delegation walked out of the 2001 notorious hatefest posing as an anti-racism conference in Durban, South Africa. That walkout, directed by Secretary of State Colin Powell, would have made a much bigger splash if 9/11 hadn't happened shortly afterward.

Powell's move was applauded by most Americans, with a few exceptions, like the Rev. Jeremiah Wright, who said in a sermon a year later that Washington had left Durban because "somebody dared to point out the racism" prevalent "both here and in Israel."

And the "review" conference in April is on track to be just as odious - with direct assaults on free speech, the right to defend against terrorism and of course on the world's eternal boogeyman, Israel.

Wright must be happy, now that his long time congregant and major donor is in office and following his preferences on Israel.