Pelosi's daughter with a 'drive by' documentary on McCain-Palin supporters

Last seen training her liberal camera lens on disgraced preacher Ted Haggard, Alexandra Pelosi, daughter of House speaker Nancy Pelosi, decided to make a real hit piece of a documentary on the supporters of Sarah Palin and John McCain.

Even the Washington Post is disgusted:

It's drive-by journalism, to put it charitably, a string of stupefyingly brief hit-and-run interviews with a bunch of unidentified people who we know are going to say nothing that will surprise us. By then, we've already figured out they're going to be fried by Pelosi's camera. We know they're going to sound like yahoos, often goaded, always reduced to sound bites and caricatures.

All the conventions of the smirking, winking, belittling political documentary are abided by in this film. An inordinate number of the yahoos wear T-shirts and weird caps. There is the obligatory NASCAR tailgating scene with the requisite Confederate flags and some white guys saying they'll never vote for any black man. There are a couple of campaign events sporting all-American schoolgirl choruses who sound like they're right off the "Up With People" tour bus. There is a young guy whose T-shirt, meant to deride Obama, declares "Say No to Socilism," and when Alexandra Pelosi tells him he's misspelled socialism and asks him to define it, we know he's not going to be able to, that he's going to say something way wrong and stupid -- which he does, offering that socialism is "basically, it's like the views of Hitler. It's between like communism and -- I don't know what the other word is."

In short, it's good yuks time.

The reviewer, Michael Leahy, gets to the nub of Pelosi's stupidity:

This is less a documentary than a reason for a snarky laugh track. As a reporter who spent much of 2008 writing about McCain and talking with many of his most ardent supporters, I certainly met angry conservatives along the way. A few times I was accosted by people who excoriated the media they loathed while expressing assorted fears of Obama -- their conviction that he would bring ruin to the country; that he was a rogue Middle Eastern agent; that he would seize their guns; that he would make a point of keeping the white man down.

But such opinions were a decided minority. I best remember a February day when, along with the rest of the traveling press, I watched the candidate attend rallies in Tennessee, Alabama and Georgia. By then, McCain was a prohibitive favorite to win the Republican nomination, and many of the conversations among his admirers at the Southern events were about whether Obama or Hillary Clinton would face him in the general election.

While passionate in their opposition to Democrats, most of the conservatives I met at the rallies that day expressed fascination and respect for Obama. They wouldn't be voting for him, but they felt pride in a country that at last was giving serious consideration to electing an African American. Many viewed his climb as a symbol of American social progress.

And that's the bottom line. It is perfectly acceptable for documentaries to have a point of view. All good ones have. But when the filmmaker tries to prejudice the audience by unfairly characterizing her subjects and deliberately using the art of the documentarian to selectively cut and paste images and sound bites to embarass rather than illuminate, you have a hack job instead of art.

I think I'll skip Miss Pelosi's hit piece, thank you.



Hat Tip: Ed Lasky







Last seen training her liberal camera lens on disgraced preacher Ted Haggard, Alexandra Pelosi, daughter of House speaker Nancy Pelosi, decided to make a real hit piece of a documentary on the supporters of Sarah Palin and John McCain.

Even the Washington Post is disgusted:

It's drive-by journalism, to put it charitably, a string of stupefyingly brief hit-and-run interviews with a bunch of unidentified people who we know are going to say nothing that will surprise us. By then, we've already figured out they're going to be fried by Pelosi's camera. We know they're going to sound like yahoos, often goaded, always reduced to sound bites and caricatures.

All the conventions of the smirking, winking, belittling political documentary are abided by in this film. An inordinate number of the yahoos wear T-shirts and weird caps. There is the obligatory NASCAR tailgating scene with the requisite Confederate flags and some white guys saying they'll never vote for any black man. There are a couple of campaign events sporting all-American schoolgirl choruses who sound like they're right off the "Up With People" tour bus. There is a young guy whose T-shirt, meant to deride Obama, declares "Say No to Socilism," and when Alexandra Pelosi tells him he's misspelled socialism and asks him to define it, we know he's not going to be able to, that he's going to say something way wrong and stupid -- which he does, offering that socialism is "basically, it's like the views of Hitler. It's between like communism and -- I don't know what the other word is."

In short, it's good yuks time.

The reviewer, Michael Leahy, gets to the nub of Pelosi's stupidity:

This is less a documentary than a reason for a snarky laugh track. As a reporter who spent much of 2008 writing about McCain and talking with many of his most ardent supporters, I certainly met angry conservatives along the way. A few times I was accosted by people who excoriated the media they loathed while expressing assorted fears of Obama -- their conviction that he would bring ruin to the country; that he was a rogue Middle Eastern agent; that he would seize their guns; that he would make a point of keeping the white man down.

But such opinions were a decided minority. I best remember a February day when, along with the rest of the traveling press, I watched the candidate attend rallies in Tennessee, Alabama and Georgia. By then, McCain was a prohibitive favorite to win the Republican nomination, and many of the conversations among his admirers at the Southern events were about whether Obama or Hillary Clinton would face him in the general election.

While passionate in their opposition to Democrats, most of the conservatives I met at the rallies that day expressed fascination and respect for Obama. They wouldn't be voting for him, but they felt pride in a country that at last was giving serious consideration to electing an African American. Many viewed his climb as a symbol of American social progress.

And that's the bottom line. It is perfectly acceptable for documentaries to have a point of view. All good ones have. But when the filmmaker tries to prejudice the audience by unfairly characterizing her subjects and deliberately using the art of the documentarian to selectively cut and paste images and sound bites to embarass rather than illuminate, you have a hack job instead of art.

I think I'll skip Miss Pelosi's hit piece, thank you.



Hat Tip: Ed Lasky