Obama's New Definition of 'Bipartisan'

Kyle-Anne Shiver & Lee Cary
In the President’s dictionary of political terms, “bipartisan” means this: If I, the President, listen to your ideas, then you must accept mine. It’s unilateral bipartisanism.

Barack Obama’s fundamental mindset of Orwellian doublethink continues to reveal itself as he, again, espouses two contradictory beliefs at the same time, seemingly accepting both. 

Although Obama doublethink existed during the campaign, big media made no effort to examine or question it.

In his televised speech to Democrat members of the House last night, President Obama said:

“Look, I value the constructive criticism and healthy debate that is a foundation of American democracy. I don't think any of us have cornered the market on wisdom, or that good ideas are the province of any party. The American people know that our challenges are great. They're not expecting Democratic solutions or Republican solutions -- they want American solutions. And I have said that to those who have criticized the plan. 

But what I have also said is -- don't come to table with the same tired arguments and worn ideas that helped create this crisis.” [Emphasis added.]

That’s doublethink: I value constructive criticism that represents the same tired Republican arguments. Say what?

In his Wednesday op-ed piece to the Washington Post, President Obama wrote this:

“In recent days, there have been misguided criticisms of this plan that echo the failed theories that helped lead us into this crisis -- the notion that tax cuts alone will solve all our problems; that we can meet our enormous tests with half-steps and piecemeal measures; that we can ignore fundamental challenges such as energy independence and the high cost of health care and still expect our economy and our country to thrive.” [Emphasis added.]

Today, if Republican Senators paid attention to his speech last night, we should hear a rebuttal to Obama’s assertion that tax cuts are old “failed policies” that prompted the current crisis, and that expanding the role and expenditures of the Federal government is something new.

We didn’t spend our way out of the Great Depression, and we can’t escape the current situation by increasing federal spending and indebtedness. That old notion has been tried and failed. According to economics Thomas E. Hall and J. David Ferguson:

“[T]he Great Depression was ended by an enormous stimulus to aggregate demand caused by a combination of rapid monetary growth [dollars pumped into the economy by the FED, after nears of counterproductive policies, and not injected fiscally through government expenditures] beginning in 1938 [after years of New Deal spending efforts] and, later, the U.S. defense buildup and increased orders for war material from Great Britain.”
The Great Depression: An International Disaster of Perverse Economic Policies, University of Michigan Press, 1998, pp. 155-156.


In the President’s dictionary of political terms, “bipartisan” means this: If I, the President, listen to your ideas, then you must accept mine. It’s unilateral bipartisanism.

Barack Obama’s fundamental mindset of Orwellian doublethink continues to reveal itself as he, again, espouses two contradictory beliefs at the same time, seemingly accepting both. 

Although Obama doublethink existed during the campaign, big media made no effort to examine or question it.

In his televised speech to Democrat members of the House last night, President Obama said:

“Look, I value the constructive criticism and healthy debate that is a foundation of American democracy. I don't think any of us have cornered the market on wisdom, or that good ideas are the province of any party. The American people know that our challenges are great. They're not expecting Democratic solutions or Republican solutions -- they want American solutions. And I have said that to those who have criticized the plan. 

But what I have also said is -- don't come to table with the same tired arguments and worn ideas that helped create this crisis.” [Emphasis added.]

That’s doublethink: I value constructive criticism that represents the same tired Republican arguments. Say what?

In his Wednesday op-ed piece to the Washington Post, President Obama wrote this:

“In recent days, there have been misguided criticisms of this plan that echo the failed theories that helped lead us into this crisis -- the notion that tax cuts alone will solve all our problems; that we can meet our enormous tests with half-steps and piecemeal measures; that we can ignore fundamental challenges such as energy independence and the high cost of health care and still expect our economy and our country to thrive.” [Emphasis added.]

Today, if Republican Senators paid attention to his speech last night, we should hear a rebuttal to Obama’s assertion that tax cuts are old “failed policies” that prompted the current crisis, and that expanding the role and expenditures of the Federal government is something new.

We didn’t spend our way out of the Great Depression, and we can’t escape the current situation by increasing federal spending and indebtedness. That old notion has been tried and failed. According to economics Thomas E. Hall and J. David Ferguson:

“[T]he Great Depression was ended by an enormous stimulus to aggregate demand caused by a combination of rapid monetary growth [dollars pumped into the economy by the FED, after nears of counterproductive policies, and not injected fiscally through government expenditures] beginning in 1938 [after years of New Deal spending efforts] and, later, the U.S. defense buildup and increased orders for war material from Great Britain.”
The Great Depression: An International Disaster of Perverse Economic Policies, University of Michigan Press, 1998, pp. 155-156.