New Urban Affairs Czar

Jeanette Colville
Change comes to America, as promised by President Barack Obama, with the establishment of the brand new White House Office of Urban Affairs.

This new presidential urban power house is a critical need according to the former community organizer and agitator, because "urban areas are where 80% of the American people live and work."

Heading up this high level operation is the controversial Bronx Borough President Adolfo Carrion along with second in command, New York Governor Patterson's Washington lobbyist Derek Douglas.

Michael Mcauliff of the New York Daily News reports Obama's announcement.
"The Urban Affairs office will focus on wise investments and development in our urban areas that will create employment and housing opportunities and make our country more competitive, prosperous, and strong," he said by way of explaining the new office.

Carrion's appointment is seen by some as a nod to Latino voters who helped put Obama in the White House. Obama has already named two Hispanics to his cabinet, Interior Secretary Ken Salazar and Labor Secretary-designate Hilda Solis.

Douglas started working for Gov. Paterson in 2007, lobbying for the state's interests after working for the Center for American Progress, the liberal think tank headed by John Podesta, who ran Obama's White House transition.

Others dispute the accomplishments of the Bronx President, noting that the major urban development projects for which Carrion takes credit were made possible by New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg. A website established by Bronx residents to "tell the rest of the story", countering Carrion's public relations office, writes:
As for urban development, the major projects that have moved forward in The Bronx during the past seven years were all generated out of Mayor Michael Bloomberg's office.

Carrion has shown no real initiative to rebuild The Bronx's economic standing, and at best has stayed out of the way while other offices worked. The Bronx's unemployment rate is still the highest in the State, and its poverty rate is still one of the highest in the nation. That was true when Carrion came into power, and that remains true today. Has Carrion been effective in changing that? Clearly, the answer is no.

One thing that may boost Mr. Carrion's and Mr. Douglas's popularity among Obama's inner circle of power is their record of success at pleasing Big Labor by keeping American's favorite store, WalMart, out of every borough of New York City. Much to the detriment of consumers, New York City unions and their friends in high places have kept prices high and choice restricted for low income consumers.
Change comes to America, as promised by President Barack Obama, with the establishment of the brand new White House Office of Urban Affairs.

This new presidential urban power house is a critical need according to the former community organizer and agitator, because "urban areas are where 80% of the American people live and work."

Heading up this high level operation is the controversial Bronx Borough President Adolfo Carrion along with second in command, New York Governor Patterson's Washington lobbyist Derek Douglas.

Michael Mcauliff of the New York Daily News reports Obama's announcement.
"The Urban Affairs office will focus on wise investments and development in our urban areas that will create employment and housing opportunities and make our country more competitive, prosperous, and strong," he said by way of explaining the new office.

Carrion's appointment is seen by some as a nod to Latino voters who helped put Obama in the White House. Obama has already named two Hispanics to his cabinet, Interior Secretary Ken Salazar and Labor Secretary-designate Hilda Solis.

Douglas started working for Gov. Paterson in 2007, lobbying for the state's interests after working for the Center for American Progress, the liberal think tank headed by John Podesta, who ran Obama's White House transition.

Others dispute the accomplishments of the Bronx President, noting that the major urban development projects for which Carrion takes credit were made possible by New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg. A website established by Bronx residents to "tell the rest of the story", countering Carrion's public relations office, writes:
As for urban development, the major projects that have moved forward in The Bronx during the past seven years were all generated out of Mayor Michael Bloomberg's office.

Carrion has shown no real initiative to rebuild The Bronx's economic standing, and at best has stayed out of the way while other offices worked. The Bronx's unemployment rate is still the highest in the State, and its poverty rate is still one of the highest in the nation. That was true when Carrion came into power, and that remains true today. Has Carrion been effective in changing that? Clearly, the answer is no.

One thing that may boost Mr. Carrion's and Mr. Douglas's popularity among Obama's inner circle of power is their record of success at pleasing Big Labor by keeping American's favorite store, WalMart, out of every borough of New York City. Much to the detriment of consumers, New York City unions and their friends in high places have kept prices high and choice restricted for low income consumers.