More casualties of environmentalism

Environmental policies have caused millions of casualties over the years. The banning of DDT resulted in millions of African children dying from malaria. Growing corn for fuel has resulted in starvation in third world countries. Now from down under we have the tragic results of another unintended consequence of overzealous environmental policies. The Australian newspaper The Age has the story:

ANGRY residents last night accused local authorities of contributing to the bushfire toll by failing to let residents chop down trees and clear up bushland that posed a fire risk.

During question time at a packed community meeting in Arthurs Creek on Melbourne's northern fringe, Warwick Spooner — whose mother Marilyn and brother Damien perished along with their home in the Strathewen blaze — criticised the Nillumbik council for the limitations it placed on residents wanting the council's help or permission to clean up around their properties in preparation for the bushfire season. "We've lost two people in my family because you dickheads won't cut trees down," he said.

"We wanted trees cut down on the side of the road … and you can't even cut the grass for God's sake."

Later, the meeting was cut short when Mr Spooner's father, Dennis, collapsed in his chair and an ambulance had to be called. Despite losing his wife and son and everything he owned, a friend later said he had not stopped or slept since the weekend.

Another resident said she had asked the council four times to tend to out-of-control growth on public land near her home, but her pleas had been ignored.

There was widespread applause when Nillumbik Mayor Bo Bendtsen said changes were likely to be made about the council's policy surrounding native vegetation.

But his response was not good enough for Mr Spooner: "It's too late now mate. We've lost families, we've lost people."

In my grandparents day farmers here in Texas would burn the underbrush around their farms and in the forest every year. This slow burning fire cleaned out the brush and grass but didn't bother the trees and made it practically impossible to start forest fires.

Now in the environmentalists quest to save every bush and weed, we have huge forest fires consuming thousand of acres every year, not to mention the loss of human life and property.

Why are we not surprised that another environmental policy has resulted in horrific unintended consequences? It's unfortunate that it takes the loss of life before we stand up to these enviro-nuts.
Environmental policies have caused millions of casualties over the years. The banning of DDT resulted in millions of African children dying from malaria. Growing corn for fuel has resulted in starvation in third world countries. Now from down under we have the tragic results of another unintended consequence of overzealous environmental policies. The Australian newspaper The Age has the story:

ANGRY residents last night accused local authorities of contributing to the bushfire toll by failing to let residents chop down trees and clear up bushland that posed a fire risk.

During question time at a packed community meeting in Arthurs Creek on Melbourne's northern fringe, Warwick Spooner — whose mother Marilyn and brother Damien perished along with their home in the Strathewen blaze — criticised the Nillumbik council for the limitations it placed on residents wanting the council's help or permission to clean up around their properties in preparation for the bushfire season. "We've lost two people in my family because you dickheads won't cut trees down," he said.

"We wanted trees cut down on the side of the road … and you can't even cut the grass for God's sake."

Later, the meeting was cut short when Mr Spooner's father, Dennis, collapsed in his chair and an ambulance had to be called. Despite losing his wife and son and everything he owned, a friend later said he had not stopped or slept since the weekend.

Another resident said she had asked the council four times to tend to out-of-control growth on public land near her home, but her pleas had been ignored.

There was widespread applause when Nillumbik Mayor Bo Bendtsen said changes were likely to be made about the council's policy surrounding native vegetation.

But his response was not good enough for Mr Spooner: "It's too late now mate. We've lost families, we've lost people."

In my grandparents day farmers here in Texas would burn the underbrush around their farms and in the forest every year. This slow burning fire cleaned out the brush and grass but didn't bother the trees and made it practically impossible to start forest fires.

Now in the environmentalists quest to save every bush and weed, we have huge forest fires consuming thousand of acres every year, not to mention the loss of human life and property.

Why are we not surprised that another environmental policy has resulted in horrific unintended consequences? It's unfortunate that it takes the loss of life before we stand up to these enviro-nuts.