100 Congressmen place earmarks in spending bill for clients of one lobbying company

Rick Moran
Earmark reform? Didn't you hear? The Democrats fixed it all up in 2007.

Not exactly:

No matter what the outcome of the federal investigation, PMA’s earmark success illustrates how a well-connected lobbying firm operates on Capitol Hill. And earmark accountability rules imposed by the Democrats in 2007 make it possible to see how extensively PMA worked the Hill for its clients.

In the spending bill managed by Murtha, the fiscal 2008 Defense appropriation, 104 House members got earmarks for projects sought by PMA clients, according to Congressional Quarterly’s analysis of a database constructed by Ashdown’s group.

Those House members, plus a handful of senators, combined to route nearly $300 million in public money to clients of PMA through that one law (PL 110-116).

And when the lawmakers were in need — as they all are to finance their campaigns — PMA came through for them.

According to CQ MoneyLine, the same House members who took responsibility for PMA’s earmarks in that spending bill have, since 2001, accepted a cumulative $1,815,138 in campaign contributions from PMA’s political action committee and employees of the firm.

PMA is being investigated for giving illegal contributions to Pennsylvania Congressman John Murtha (D) who is considered the King of the Earmark. The sordid nature of Murtha's relationship with PMA - and two other firms connected to the lobbying group - has now ensnared more than 100 members. 

The fact that a majority of them are Democrats means little. Forty two Republicans caught up in this mess is more than enough to make this a truly bi-partisan scandal.

Too bad they can't get along this well when it comes to governing the country instead of filling up their campaign coffers.

 



Earmark reform? Didn't you hear? The Democrats fixed it all up in 2007.

Not exactly:

No matter what the outcome of the federal investigation, PMA’s earmark success illustrates how a well-connected lobbying firm operates on Capitol Hill. And earmark accountability rules imposed by the Democrats in 2007 make it possible to see how extensively PMA worked the Hill for its clients.

In the spending bill managed by Murtha, the fiscal 2008 Defense appropriation, 104 House members got earmarks for projects sought by PMA clients, according to Congressional Quarterly’s analysis of a database constructed by Ashdown’s group.

Those House members, plus a handful of senators, combined to route nearly $300 million in public money to clients of PMA through that one law (PL 110-116).

And when the lawmakers were in need — as they all are to finance their campaigns — PMA came through for them.

According to CQ MoneyLine, the same House members who took responsibility for PMA’s earmarks in that spending bill have, since 2001, accepted a cumulative $1,815,138 in campaign contributions from PMA’s political action committee and employees of the firm.

PMA is being investigated for giving illegal contributions to Pennsylvania Congressman John Murtha (D) who is considered the King of the Earmark. The sordid nature of Murtha's relationship with PMA - and two other firms connected to the lobbying group - has now ensnared more than 100 members. 

The fact that a majority of them are Democrats means little. Forty two Republicans caught up in this mess is more than enough to make this a truly bi-partisan scandal.

Too bad they can't get along this well when it comes to governing the country instead of filling up their campaign coffers.