Obama still dodging straight answers on his smoking

It has been said that "he who is not faithful in the small things, will not be faithful in the important things."  As has been noted by AT, Barack Obama has yet to kick his smoking habit. When asked by Tom Brokaw on NBC's "Meet the Press" whether or not he has indeed quit, Obama gave a clinic on how to dodge even the simplest of  "yes-no" questions.  (Warning, if the second hand smoke doesn't get you, the cow dung surely will:)

Appearing on NBC's "Meet the Press" program, interviewer Tom Brokaw told Obama he had ducked answering the question during an interview last month with ABC's Barbara Walters.

Noting that the White House was a no-smoking zone, Brokaw asked Obama, "Have you stopped smoking?"

"I have," Obama replied, smiling broadly. "What I said was that there are times where I have fallen off the wagon."

"Wait a minute," Brokaw interjected, "that means you haven't stopped."

"Fair enough," Obama said. "What I would say is that I have done a terrific job under the circumstances of making myself much healthier. You will not see any violations of these rules in the White House."

This begs the obvious question: If we can't get a straight answer out of Barack Obama about a  personal habit like smoking, are we to expect any different with the economy, taxes, defense, spending, or past associations?
It has been said that "he who is not faithful in the small things, will not be faithful in the important things."  As has been noted by AT, Barack Obama has yet to kick his smoking habit. When asked by Tom Brokaw on NBC's "Meet the Press" whether or not he has indeed quit, Obama gave a clinic on how to dodge even the simplest of  "yes-no" questions.  (Warning, if the second hand smoke doesn't get you, the cow dung surely will:)

Appearing on NBC's "Meet the Press" program, interviewer Tom Brokaw told Obama he had ducked answering the question during an interview last month with ABC's Barbara Walters.

Noting that the White House was a no-smoking zone, Brokaw asked Obama, "Have you stopped smoking?"

"I have," Obama replied, smiling broadly. "What I said was that there are times where I have fallen off the wagon."

"Wait a minute," Brokaw interjected, "that means you haven't stopped."

"Fair enough," Obama said. "What I would say is that I have done a terrific job under the circumstances of making myself much healthier. You will not see any violations of these rules in the White House."

This begs the obvious question: If we can't get a straight answer out of Barack Obama about a  personal habit like smoking, are we to expect any different with the economy, taxes, defense, spending, or past associations?