NY Governor Paterson wants "Obesity Tax"

Those of us who smoke have seen this coming for years. Once the government gets it in its head that it can dictate what are acceptable behaviors, the sky's the limit.

In the case of New York state, Governor Paterson has determined that if you are overweight, it is the responsibility of the government to get you slim and trim:

The so-called obesity tax would generate an estimated $404 million a year. Milk, juice, diet soda and bottled water would be exempt from the tax.

"I'll just buy less," said Victor Lopez, 55, of Manhattan, as he drank a Coke at a midtown Subway store.

"I don't like to buy Diet Coke," said Amaury Garcia, 16, who works at a flower shop in Penn Station. "I'll just not buy any sodas if it goes up."

Public health advocates welcomed news of the tax, saying it would help the fight against childhood obesity.

"Raising the price of this liquid candy will put children and teens on a path to a healthier diet," said Elie Ward of the American Academy of Pediatrics of New York State.

Perhaps if schools didn't cut recess, high school athletics, and physical education programs, kids would be a little less chubby and who knows? Perhaps they would seek out opportunities to play the games they learned at school even at home.

But that is not as important as being the boss of you. "Public health advocates" are taking the first step in banning foods that they don't want you to eat.

This kind of nanny statism we can do without and has no place in a free society.



Those of us who smoke have seen this coming for years. Once the government gets it in its head that it can dictate what are acceptable behaviors, the sky's the limit.

In the case of New York state, Governor Paterson has determined that if you are overweight, it is the responsibility of the government to get you slim and trim:

The so-called obesity tax would generate an estimated $404 million a year. Milk, juice, diet soda and bottled water would be exempt from the tax.

"I'll just buy less," said Victor Lopez, 55, of Manhattan, as he drank a Coke at a midtown Subway store.

"I don't like to buy Diet Coke," said Amaury Garcia, 16, who works at a flower shop in Penn Station. "I'll just not buy any sodas if it goes up."

Public health advocates welcomed news of the tax, saying it would help the fight against childhood obesity.

"Raising the price of this liquid candy will put children and teens on a path to a healthier diet," said Elie Ward of the American Academy of Pediatrics of New York State.

Perhaps if schools didn't cut recess, high school athletics, and physical education programs, kids would be a little less chubby and who knows? Perhaps they would seek out opportunities to play the games they learned at school even at home.

But that is not as important as being the boss of you. "Public health advocates" are taking the first step in banning foods that they don't want you to eat.

This kind of nanny statism we can do without and has no place in a free society.