FBI Whistleblower Files 8 Page Complaint Re Ted Stevens Case

Clarice Feldman
The Anchorage Daily News is reporting that an FBI agent who worked on the criminal case against Ted Stevens has filed an 8 page complaint charging his fellow agents and the prosecution with misconduct in the prosecution of Ted Stevens, longtime Republican Senator from Alaska who lost his re-election bid after he was found guilty in that case.The presiding judge has released the document to the public.

The redacted -- meaning partially blacked-out -- complaint was publicly filed this afternoon in Washington, D.C., by the judge in the Stevens trial over the objections of Justice Department lawyers and the attorney for the unidentified whistleblower. Stevens' lawyers wanted the full document released without restrictions.[snip]

"I have witnessed or learned of serious violations of policy, rules and procedures as well as possible criminal violations," the whistleblower asserted in his complaint to the Justice Department's Office of Professional Responsibility.

The whistleblower said agents got too close to sources, took gifts and favors from sources, and revealed confidential grand jury and investigation information to sources and reporters.

The whistleblower also said members of the prosecution team intentionally withheld information from Stevens' defense that was required by law to be turned over. In addition, the prosecution deliberately failed to alert the defense that it was sending a key witness back to Alaska without testifying even though that witness was under a defense subpoena.

Prosecutors and agents also failed to properly log and track evidence, the whistleblower said.

The Washington Times has more including this:
"According to the complaint, another FBI agent had improper relationships with witnesses, including star witness Bill Allen, a wealthy oil magnate who paid for the renovations to Stevens' home. The agent shared meals and confidential law enforcement information with Mr. Allen and others, according to the complaint.

The agent also accepted help finding a house to buy, artwork and employment for a relative from at least one person cooperating with the investigation.

U.S. District Judge Emmet Sullivan
noted the irony of that accusation, pointing out in his ruling "that the defendant in this case was convicted for failing to disclose that he had accepted multiple things of value and, in fact, the trial included testimony about his receipt of artwork and employment for a relative."
Defense attorney Robert M. Cary wrote "the parallel is stunning."

The Anchorage Daily News is reporting that an FBI agent who worked on the criminal case against Ted Stevens has filed an 8 page complaint charging his fellow agents and the prosecution with misconduct in the prosecution of Ted Stevens, longtime Republican Senator from Alaska who lost his re-election bid after he was found guilty in that case.The presiding judge has released the document to the public.

The redacted -- meaning partially blacked-out -- complaint was publicly filed this afternoon in Washington, D.C., by the judge in the Stevens trial over the objections of Justice Department lawyers and the attorney for the unidentified whistleblower. Stevens' lawyers wanted the full document released without restrictions.[snip]

"I have witnessed or learned of serious violations of policy, rules and procedures as well as possible criminal violations," the whistleblower asserted in his complaint to the Justice Department's Office of Professional Responsibility.

The whistleblower said agents got too close to sources, took gifts and favors from sources, and revealed confidential grand jury and investigation information to sources and reporters.

The whistleblower also said members of the prosecution team intentionally withheld information from Stevens' defense that was required by law to be turned over. In addition, the prosecution deliberately failed to alert the defense that it was sending a key witness back to Alaska without testifying even though that witness was under a defense subpoena.

Prosecutors and agents also failed to properly log and track evidence, the whistleblower said.

The Washington Times has more including this:
"According to the complaint, another FBI agent had improper relationships with witnesses, including star witness Bill Allen, a wealthy oil magnate who paid for the renovations to Stevens' home. The agent shared meals and confidential law enforcement information with Mr. Allen and others, according to the complaint.

The agent also accepted help finding a house to buy, artwork and employment for a relative from at least one person cooperating with the investigation.

U.S. District Judge Emmet Sullivan
noted the irony of that accusation, pointing out in his ruling "that the defendant in this case was convicted for failing to disclose that he had accepted multiple things of value and, in fact, the trial included testimony about his receipt of artwork and employment for a relative."
Defense attorney Robert M. Cary wrote "the parallel is stunning."